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Tag Archives: students

Last minute Christmas gifts available at city centre market

PHOTOGRAPHY students will be showing off images of “hidden Bradford” at a festive market tomorrow.

The latest Made Bradford market will feature a stall by students from the photography course at the Bradford School of Art. The students had been given a brief to create three images with the hidden Bradford theme. The top three students were given a stall at the market.

It is the final Made Bradford market of the year, and many of the stalls will be selling festive gifts, ideal for last minute presents.

There will also be a choir performing during the day.

The Made Bradford market was set up earlier this year as a way to highlight local producers, and all the stall holders come from Bradford or Yorkshire.

The first few markets were held on Darley Street, but the market has since moved to Oastler Square as part of a push to bring more people to the “top of town.”

Tomorrow’s market runs in Oastler Square from 10am to 4pm.

There has been an increased push to bring festive spirit to the top of town, with local businesses donating to install a Christmas tree in the square last month.

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‘Remarkable’ 33% increase in visitors to National Science and Media Museum

THE National Science and Media Museum, which faced closure four years ago, has seen visitor numbers rise by a third in the past year.

The centre welcomed 362,000 people through its doors between April and December 2017, which is 90,000 more visitors than it saw for the same period in 2016.

Director Jo Quinton-Tulloch said the turnaround in the museum’s fortunes felt “amazing” and added that it is partly down to the “passionate and determined” staff.

She said: “We are delighted. We were expecting it to be a good year but we have exceeded expectations.

“So many people are coming back to the museum and having a good time while they are here.”

She added that data shows that the site has seen an increase in new visitors as well as regular and lapsed visitors.

Arts Minister John Glen MP took a tour of the museum yesterday and congratulated Ms Quinton-Tulloch on the centre’s “fantastic success”.

He said: “I think a lot of work has been done to restore the reputation and credibility of this museum and by refocussing it around science and media they have achieved a great deal.

“The visitor numbers speak for themselves. To increase by a third in a year is remarkable and a tribute to the 80 members of staff who work here.”

Mr Glen looked around the exhibitions and said one of this favourite attractions was the interactive sound bite, where visitors can bite a metal rod while putting their fingers in their ears and hear a tune through the vibrations on their teeth.

After having a go himself, he added: “For young people, that is really inspiring.

“It’s nice to see a museum with such a range of exhibitions.

“I’m impressed with the imaginative and clever way that the director here has put together some very interesting collections on subjects everybody is interested in.”

Mr Glen added that he enjoyed the photography exhibition and said the partnership with the BFI allows students to view archive material that is not available on the internet.

He said the city can look forward to exciting future developments and revealed that he has already been “lobbied hard” by Shipley MP Philip Davies for the area to benefit from the £15million Northern Cultural Regeneration Fund.

The museum hosted Tim Peake’s Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft until November, which Ms Quinton-Tulloch said had helped boost visitor numbers.

She added that there has also been an increase in school trips to the centre.

South Craven School teacher struck off

A PE teacher at South Craven School has been struck off after a misconduct hearing heard how he told a pupil he wanted to “unwrap her” and that he liked “naughty girls”.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership found that 37-year-old Paul Cuthbertson “fell significantly short” of expected professional standards.

He was accused of inappropriate contact with several pupils, as well as with a parent of a student, between 2015 and the beginning of 2016.

He was banned from teaching indefinitely and cannot apply for the order to be lifted until at least 2019.

Cuthbertson, who had been employed by the school since 2006 and coached the girls’ football team, told one girl he “fancied her all through school and had let her get away with things because he liked naughty girls”.

He also told a pupil he wanted to kiss her, and asked her to come to his house in a box so he could “unwrap” her.

He told another girl he was going to “check out the talent in Aldi”.

In comments to the girl’s mother, the panel heard he had used the term “Bradistan” to describe Bradford and told her he was a “man in demand”.

The panel heard he also compared the school’s head to Mr Majeika – a children’s book and television series about a wizard teacher.

Cuthbertson, who was not present at the hearing, admitted some of the allegations against him, but denied sending Facebook messages to a girl, claiming his account had been hacked.

This was dismissed by the panel as “highly unlikely” as he had previously been warned about his behaviour on social media by the school’s safeguarding team.

South Craven headteacher, Andrew Cummings, said Paul Cuthbertson resigned from South Craven School in January 2016 during an investigation into unacceptable professional conduct while employed as a PE teacher.

“The school took action as soon as the allegations came to light and Mr Cuthbertson was immediately suspended,” he said.

“The school supported by safeguarding agencies continued the investigation even though Mr Cuthbertson had resigned and reported their findings to the relevant authorities, which resulted in Mr Cuthbertson’s prohibition from teaching. The welfare and safety of our students is always our primary concern.”

Pervert PE teacher told pupil he’d fancied her all through school

A PE teacher at South Craven School has been struck off after a misconduct hearing heard how he told a pupil he wanted to “unwrap her” and that he liked “naughty girls”.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership found that 37-year-old Paul Cuthbertson “fell significantly short” of expected professional standards.

He was accused of inappropriate contact with several pupils, as well as with a parent of a student, between 2015 and the beginning of 2016.

He was banned from teaching indefinitely and cannot apply for the order to be lifted until at least 2019.

Cuthbertson, who had been employed by the school since 2006 and coached the girls’ football team, told one girl he “fancied her all through school and had let her get away with things because he liked naughty girls”.

He also told a pupil he wanted to kiss her, and asked her to come to his house in a box so he could “unwrap” her.

He told another girl he was going to “check out the talent in Aldi”.

In comments to the girl’s mother, the panel heard he had used the term “Bradistan” to describe Bradford and told her he was a “man in demand”.

The panel heard he also compared the school’s head to Mr Majeika – a children’s book and television series about a wizard teacher.

Cuthbertson, who was not present at the hearing, admitted some of the allegations against him, but denied sending Facebook messages to a girl, claiming his account had been hacked.

This was dismissed by the panel as “highly unlikely” as he had previously been warned about his behaviour on social media by the school’s safeguarding team.

South Craven headteacher, Andrew Cummings, said Paul Cuthbertson resigned from South Craven School in January 2016 during an investigation into unacceptable professional conduct while employed as a PE teacher.

“The school took action as soon as the allegations came to light and Mr Cuthbertson was immediately suspended,” he said.

“The school supported by safeguarding agencies continued the investigation even though Mr Cuthbertson had resigned and reported their findings to the relevant authorities, which resulted in Mr Cuthbertson’s prohibition from teaching. The welfare and safety of our students is always our primary concern.”

Wealthy students tighten grip on university places

Students in librariesImage copyright Getty Images

The most advantaged teens have tightened their grip on university places, pulling further ahead of the least advantaged, Ucas data shows.

Although more poorer students won places at university this year, wealthy students increased at a higher rate.

Universities Minister Jo Johnson said he was reforming the sector to encourage equality of opportunity.

The data also shows the number of unconditional offers made to students jumped 40% last year to 51,615.

These are offers made to students on the basis of their predicted grades rather than their actual results.

Although at least one unconditional offer was made to 17.5% of students it is important to remember that students generally make five choices.

This year, unconditional offers accounted for less than 1% of offers made by the largest 140 higher education providers.

Equality measure

Assessing the year-on-year data, the University and College Admissions Service said there had been no progress in equal representation since 2014.

Successive ministers have required universities to do more to increase access for disadvantaged groups.

And Prime Minister Theresa May pledged to put social mobility at the heart of her policies

Ucas is using a new measure of equality that combines social background, ethnicity and gender to examine how well universities are opening their doors to all sections of society.

Statisticians feel it sheds more light on the issue of equality of access because it looks at the interplay of a number of factors.

Details of this backwards step on social mobility come at a time when the chances of getting a place at university have never been higher.

In 2017, a third of 18-year-olds were accepted on to higher education courses in England.

But a detailed look at who these teenagers are shows the most advantaged group increased their entry rate by 1.8% to 53.1% in 2017.

This means over half of 18-year-olds in this top social group got places at university.

Meanwhile, 13.8% of the most disadvantaged group netted places on courses, an increase of 1.2%.

The statistics also show teenagers from the most advantaged group are still nearly 10 times more likely to attend the most competitive universities.

However, the least advantaged students have made some headway, increasing their entry rates to these top institutions by 7.4%.

Clare Marchant, chief executive of Ucas, said: “Although our analysis shows that a record number of disadvantaged young people have entered higher education this year – with the greatest increase at higher-tariff providers – gaps in participation remain wide.”

The Ucas data also again shows that white pupils are less likely to go to university than any other ethnic group.

‘More to do’

Universities Minister Jo Johnson said he was encouraged by the record entry rates for young people going to university, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

“Today’s figures show that 18-year-olds from disadvantaged areas are now 50% more likely to go university in 2017 than in 2009.

“However, we recognise that there is more to do.

“That’s why we have introduced sweeping reforms, including the new Office for Students, to ensure equality of opportunity.”

Geoff Barton, head of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: “Schools and colleges across the country are straining every sinew to improve the opportunities for disadvantaged pupils, and indeed all their young people. Significant challenges remain, however.

“In many communities, the impact of unemployment, insecure and low-paid work, and poor quality housing has had a devastating impact on the hopes and aspirations of families.

“In areas where traditional industries have collapsed, many white British families have been badly affected, and it is therefore not surprising that white pupils are proportionally less likely to go to university than other ethnic groups.”

Prof Les Ebdon, director of Fair Access to Higher Education, was encouraged by the increase in disadvantaged students at top universities, but said they were still 5.5 times less likely to attend these institutions than their advantaged peers.

“As a result, people with the potential to excel are missing out on opportunities. This is an unforgivable waste of talent, and universities must continue to press for transformational progress.”

University of Bradford students live in ‘high risk’ area for crime – according to new figures

THE area around the University of Bradford remains one of the most “high-risk” university neighbourhoods in the UK for levels of crime.

New figures from the Complete University Guide show that the university is fourth in the table of high-crime areas.

The report looks at areas where most students attending that city’s university live, and measure the crime numbers in those areas per 1,000 residents.

The figures relate to all crimes, not just crimes relating to students.

In the student areas of Bradford there were 73 crimes recorded per 1,000 people. The rates included 2.5 robberies per 1,000 residents and 14.3 burglaries.

There were also 56.2 violent or sexual assaults per 1,000 people in the past year, up from 42.94 in 2016.

Last year Bradford was judged the fifth most high-risk student area in the country.

In Bradford, the report relates to areas around Great Horton Road and the city centre where there are high levels of student accommodation.

The universities ranked lower than Bradford are the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, Manchester University and the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts.

The “safest” university is the Royal Agricultural University in Cirencester, followed by York.

In recent months there have been efforts to tackle crime in the area around the University of Bradford.

In September police ran a one-day blitz, Operation Kartfield, to tackle crime and anti-social behaviour in the Great Horton Road area. It saw people arrested for possession of drugs

and weapons.

And the Free Our Streets Campaign, to tackle sexual harassment around the university and Bradford College, began earlier this week.

A University of Bradford spokesman said: “Student safety is of paramount importance to the University and we work closely with the police, Council and other partners to ensure that students are as safe and secure as possible and have the confidence to report any incidents they may witness or experience.

“A great example of this is the newly-launched Free Our Streets project to increase the reporting of incidents of sexual harassment of female students on the streets of Great Horton, offering support to victims and to try and change the behaviour of perpetrators by confronting them with the impact of the harm they are causing.”

Dr Bernard Kingston, principal author of TheCompleteUniversityGuide.co.uk, said: “Our data accurately reflects the levels of crime of greatest relevance to students in the streets where they live while studying at university.”

New bid to tackle ‘ignorant’ sex pests who damage student quarter’s reputation

A NEW campaign to tackle sex pests around Bradford’s university and college is calling for victims to speak out against sexual harassment.

The Free Our Streets campaign will target the “ignorant young men” who harass women, and organisers hope it will help improve the city’s reputation, as well as make people feel safer in the city centre.

It will start by targeting the Great Horton Road area, near the campuses of the University of Bradford and Bradford College, and follows years of complaints that sexual harassment is making life a misery for many female students. People are being urged to report unwanted touching, heckling and cat calling, being followed, by people on foot or in vehicles, and other unwanted attention.

As well as making women feel safer, the campaign hopes to “re-educate” those responsible about what is acceptable behaviour, and one council boss hopes it will help “stamp it out.”

The campaign comes at a time when people across the world are speaking up about sexual harassment. Campaigns like #MeToo have given a voice to people who previously felt they had to keep quiet about sexual harassment, and Free Our Streets intends to have a similar impact in Bradford.

It will see Bradford Council, Restorative Solutions, West Yorkshire Police, Bradford College, the University of Bradford and the Bradford Hate Crime Alliance working together on a range of initiatives to tackle the problem. The work has also come from research done by local arts group WUR Bradford.

Carole Worthington-Hollowbread, from Restorative Solutions, one of the people running the campaign, said: “There has been a lot in the media about harassment in different workplaces. We have been working to bring this project together since February. The problem we had when we started out was that we didn’t have a lot of substantial information about what was going on. A lot of people don’t report the sexual harassment they experience because they don’t feel they can.

“This project is about encouraging people to report the harassment they experience. We need to know what is happening, where it is happening and who is involved. There is an education element of this too, we want to deal with what is happening, but to stop it from happening in the first place. It is about changing attitudes.

“We know it happens elsewhere in Bradford, but we had been told it was a specific issue in this area.”

Councillor Abdul Jabar, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Neighbourhoods and Community Safety, said: “Sexual harassment is totally unacceptable and a crime.

“The actions of a few ignorant young men not only hurts the victims but also reflects badly on the community as a whole and the reputation of the city, the university and Bradford College.

“The huge majority of people living in the area treat our students with the respect and welcome they deserve and we want to work with them to stamp out this intolerable behaviour.”

Andy Welsh, CEO of Bradford College, said: “The safety of our students and staff is our highest priority. We encourage students and staff to report any issues of harassment and advise them on how to do that.”

Nikki Pierce, Academic Registrar (Director of Student and Academic Services) at the University, said: “The safety and security of our students is of paramount importance and we are very pleased that so many organisations have come together to organise this campaign. We will be working extremely hard with our partners to ensure its success and to give confidence to our students to come forward and report any incidents.”

Insp Kevin Taylor, Partnerships’ Inspector at Bradford District Police, said: “People in Bradford should be free to go about their business without being subjected to sexual harassment. We are happy to support the Free Our Streets project and hope this multi-agency approach will make victims feel more confident to report these matters and make perpetrators think twice about engaging in such unacceptable behaviour.”

The campaign asks people to call 07582102494 if they experience or witness sexual harassment.

Central Saint Martins refunds dramatic writing students

Central Saint Martins CampusImage copyright Getty Images
Image caption Central Saint Martins has refunded all first year dramatic writing students

A top UK fashion institution has given 21 students who took a dramatic writing course a full £5,000 refund.

Central Saint Martins, whose alumni include Alexander McQueen and Stella McCartney, said the 2016-17 dramatic writing masters course had fallen “below our usual standards”.

It said students had complained about the size of the class, “teaching intensity” and poor organisation.

It is the first time the college has made a group reimbursement.

‘Duty of care’

Central Saint Martins, which is part of the University of the Arts London, said it had recruited new staff and addressed the issues raised by the students.

In an online statement, the university acknowledged that the course had failed to meet the expectations of many students, saying: “In academic year 2016-17, UAL fell below our usual standards in MA Dramatic Writing, a course taught at Central Saint Martins.

“We therefore reimbursed students on the course up to the full amount of their fee, acting promptly through our student complaints procedure.”

However, the Times has reported that some students remained unhappy despite the refund because they felt they had wasted a year and others were not impressed with having to sign a non-disclosure agreement, meaning they would have to return their refund if they spoke publicly.

Central Saint Martin’s media relations adviser Jo Ortmans told the BBC the non-disclosure agreements were needed because it had a duty of care to protect the identities of both the students and tutors involved.

She also said that the students were able to keep their degrees despite the refund, adding: “They’ve done the studies and completed the work they needed to do.”

Virtual reality helps Bradford pupils visit International Space Station

PUPILS at a Bradford school got to experience a virtual trip to back from the stars thanks to top of the range equipment.

A Samsung VR bus dropped by Carlton Bolling School to help pupils feel what it was like to descend to earth on Tim Peake’s Soyuz Capsule.

The actual capsule is touring the UK, first appearing at the National Science and Media Museum earlier this year.

The Samsung bus allowed students to experience the descent in virtual reality and explore the science of space on board the International Space Station and took part in the interactive and immersive 360° experience.

The aim of the workshop was to provide an interactive session to allow students to enhance their understanding on space physics, which forms a core part of their syllabus. This was enjoyed by many science enthusiasts and some even said the event had inspired them to pursue a career in space physics or become astronauts.

Kaiynaat Sakhi said: “This made me enjoy science even more and I am now considering a career the field of space.”

Bradford’s homeless to benefit from students’ charity work

A GROUP of students at Bradford College have collected clothes and raised £200 for the city’s homeless.

The students (pictured) all on a Prince’s Trust course, gathered donations of hats, gloves and other essential items to support people experiencing homelessness this winter.

The charitable work was part of the Team Programme, a 12-week full-time programme designed to equip people aged 16 to 25 with vital skills that will help them get into employment, further education or training. It includes a community project – with students choosing to focus on assisting the homeless.

They will now work with local charity groups including the Salvation Army, Bradford Nightstop and Bradford Soup Run to distribute the donated items and money to some of the most vulnerable people in the city.