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Tag Archives: local

Toys & Tins Appeal is huge success, thanks to generous readers and businesses

The second Telegraph & Argus Toys & TIns Appeal has been another resounding success thanks to the generosity of T&A readers and local businesses.

Bags of toys and non-perishable food have been collected and delivered to our reception in Hall Ings and have now been passed to our charity partner, Bradford Women’s Aid.

An anonymous donation of £200 from a reader has been passed to the charity and is being used to buy things specifically for the mums.

Local businesses Morrisons, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, The Entertainer toy shop and charitable organisation Purely Islam all stepped up to donate items.

And readers brought toys to us by the bagful.

Employees at Boots in The Broadway bought toys in lieu of Christmas cards and donated them.

Bradford Women’s Aid director Sally Deane said: “Thank you very much to the kind people and businesses of Bradford for supporting the T&A Toys & Tins Appeal.

“Your generosity will mean that every one of the women and children we support at BWA will receive much-needed food and gifts over the festive period.

“It will bring some happiness and comfort to what would otherwise be a very bleak time. It will mean a lot to them to know that others care about them and have shown this through their support of the T&A’s Toys & Tins Appeal.

“Our funding comes from Bradford Council, the Big Lottery Fund and Children in Need. However unfortunately, we are always in need of more funding and support for women and children in need. Our aim is for women to achieve independence and be able to attain their goals in life.”

Volunteers from the charity will now sort the toys into ages and wrap each and deliver them to the families in their charge in time for Christmas. They will also sort the donated tins and non-perishable food into food bags for the families who often have to leave a dangerous domestic situation with nothing.

Telegraph & Argus editor Nigel Burton said he was delighted by the response to help such a worthy cause again.

“I was thrilled to see such a magnificent response to our appeal for toys and tins from all our readers and local businesses and want to offer my heartfelt thanks,” he said.

Bradford Women’s Aid was set up over 30 years ago by local women who wanted to help and support women and children whose lives had been affected by domestic abuse.

The organisation provides refuge, resettlement, outreach and children’s services and last year directly supported 850 women and children, many of whom became homeless as a result of domestic abuse.

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Flood-hit club appeals against cellar move decision

A FLOOD-HIT working men’s club says it may be forced to close after almost 100 years, after a planning application to build storage above ground level was refused.

Baildon Woodbottom Working Men’s Club, off Otley Road at Baildon Bridge, near the River Aire, fell victim to the Boxing Day 2015 floods, with water reaching the tops of its pool tables.

Club officials said the damage cost an estimated £230,000, and left the club closed until June 2016.

The club, which is due to celebrate its 100th year in 2020, used the refurbishment to modernise its facilities and protect the building from future floods. It also suffered flood damage in 2000.

Bosses had applied to Bradford Council for an extension to be built at the rear of the club on a fenced-off area currently used as a car park, with ground-level storage and toilets. The extension would have allowed the club to stop using its cellar, to protect stock from any future flooding.

But the plans were refused by the local authority – due to flood risk.

Now club bosses are appealing against the decision, but fear for the club’s future if the appeal fails.

The Council’s letter of refusal states: “The Environment Agency advises that it is within a flood storage area, and the footprint and volume of the extension would cause displacement of flood waters.”

It also states the application did not include a flood risk assessment, and the Council said there was no evidence that the proposed development would not increase the risk of flooding to other properties. It said this could cause an increased risk to both property and public safety.

Philip Moncaster, club secretary, who submitted his appeal against the decision yesterday, said: “I’m disappointed with the decision.

“Refusing this may be the end of the club. If we can’t get the cellar moved, we will have to shut.

“We are not prepared to spend £700 to provide a flood risk assessment on what we already know, that we suffer from floods.

“We can’t afford to lose stock at the rate we did last year.

“We lost £10,000 worth of stock in the big flood of 2015. We want the cellar at ground floor level.”

The club won a wrangle with an insurance company over a flood damage claim earlier this year. The refurbishment was paid for by the club’s insurance company, NIG Insurance. But staff had become frustrated at £23,000 – consisting of £19,000 in irrecoverable VAT and £4,000 for wines, spirits and tobacco – still being owed to them. The total sum was eventually paid to the club in July.

Three women hurt in two-car crash in Bradford

Last minute Christmas gifts available at city centre market

PHOTOGRAPHY students will be showing off images of “hidden Bradford” at a festive market tomorrow.

The latest Made Bradford market will feature a stall by students from the photography course at the Bradford School of Art. The students had been given a brief to create three images with the hidden Bradford theme. The top three students were given a stall at the market.

It is the final Made Bradford market of the year, and many of the stalls will be selling festive gifts, ideal for last minute presents.

There will also be a choir performing during the day.

The Made Bradford market was set up earlier this year as a way to highlight local producers, and all the stall holders come from Bradford or Yorkshire.

The first few markets were held on Darley Street, but the market has since moved to Oastler Square as part of a push to bring more people to the “top of town.”

Tomorrow’s market runs in Oastler Square from 10am to 4pm.

There has been an increased push to bring festive spirit to the top of town, with local businesses donating to install a Christmas tree in the square last month.

Man trapped under scooter

Charity looking for 50 ‘Literary Champions’ from across Bradford’s communities

BRADFORD residents from all the district’s diverse communities have been asked to volunteer to help boost young people’s literacy levels.

The National Literacy Trust is looking for 50 Literary Champions who will help deliver literacy activities in their local communities.

The charity is hoping to find volunteers who reflect Bradford’s diverse communities – a new focus for the Trust’s work in Bradford. They also want people from as many different areas of the district as possible.

It is part of the charity’s Bradford Stories campaign, supported by Bradford Council, and aims to raise literacy levels through a range of projects and activities to promote reading, writing and storytelling.

A recent study from the Trust and Experian found that Bradford was a “high risk” area for literacy issues.

Bradford East is ranked 36 out of 533 constituencies in England for “literacy vulnerability”, where 1 is the most in need of literacy support. Bradford East, South and West constituencies are in the top 15 per cent of greatest literacy vulnerability in the country.

Last year, 43 per cent of children in Bradford left primary school unable to read at the expected level for their age.

The volunteers will be given training and support to help them create and deliver activities to boost literacy in their communities.

Projects that could be taken up by the Literacy Champions include setting up reading groups for adults or children, planning literacy-based outings or competitions, or helping families get involved with their local library or children’s centre.

Imran Hafeez, manager of the National Literacy Trust Hub in Bradford, said: “Local people know their community and the issues facing it better than anyone.

“We need your help to reach the people in Bradford who need help the most. Anyone can be a Literacy Champion – whether you’re a parent, business professional, teacher, student, sports coach or just passionate about making a difference in your local area.

“We want to hear from you.”

The Trust set up its Bradford Hub in 2014 with a view to improving the district’s lower-than-average literacy levels.

Initially the hub was set up for three years, but in November a £197,000 grant from Bradford-based supermarket Morrisons secured the scheme’s future for at least another year.

The Bradford scheme has recently been relaunched at Bradford Stories with an increased focus on the district’s heritage and communities.

Schemes carried out by the Trust in the district in recent years have included events at the Bradford Literature Festival, campaigns to get more fathers reading to their children and high-profile writing contests.

There have also been projects aimed at getting more boys reading.

To get more information about becoming a Literacy Champion, or to sign up to become one, visit literacytrust.org.uk/literacychampions or email bradford@literacytrust.org.uk.

Charity looking for 50 ‘Literacy Champions’ from across Bradford’s communities

BRADFORD residents from all the district’s diverse communities have been asked to volunteer to help boost young people’s literacy levels.

The National Literacy Trust is looking for 50 Literary Champions who will help deliver literacy activities in their local communities.

The charity is hoping to find volunteers who reflect Bradford’s diverse communities – a new focus for the Trust’s work in Bradford. They also want people from as many different areas of the district as possible.

It is part of the charity’s Bradford Stories campaign, supported by Bradford Council, and aims to raise literacy levels through a range of projects and activities to promote reading, writing and storytelling.

A recent study from the Trust and Experian found that Bradford was a “high risk” area for literacy issues.

Bradford East is ranked 36 out of 533 constituencies in England for “literacy vulnerability”, where 1 is the most in need of literacy support. Bradford East, South and West constituencies are in the top 15 per cent of greatest literacy vulnerability in the country.

Last year, 43 per cent of children in Bradford left primary school unable to read at the expected level for their age.

The volunteers will be given training and support to help them create and deliver activities to boost literacy in their communities.

Projects that could be taken up by the Literacy Champions include setting up reading groups for adults or children, planning literacy-based outings or competitions, or helping families get involved with their local library or children’s centre.

Imran Hafeez, manager of the National Literacy Trust Hub in Bradford, said: “Local people know their community and the issues facing it better than anyone.

“We need your help to reach the people in Bradford who need help the most. Anyone can be a Literacy Champion – whether you’re a parent, business professional, teacher, student, sports coach or just passionate about making a difference in your local area.

“We want to hear from you.”

The Trust set up its Bradford Hub in 2014 with a view to improving the district’s lower-than-average literacy levels.

Initially the hub was set up for three years, but in November a £197,000 grant from Bradford-based supermarket Morrisons secured the scheme’s future for at least another year.

The Bradford scheme has recently been relaunched at Bradford Stories with an increased focus on the district’s heritage and communities.

Schemes carried out by the Trust in the district in recent years have included events at the Bradford Literature Festival, campaigns to get more fathers reading to their children and high-profile writing contests.

There have also been projects aimed at getting more boys reading.

To get more information about becoming a Literacy Champion, or to sign up to become one, visit literacytrust.org.uk/literacychampions or email bradford@literacytrust.org.uk.

Teen trapped under bike in Cleckheaton crash

Woman seen walking along hard shoulder of the M62

Housing: More than 120,000 children are officially homeless

People leaving their home

The number of households in England staying in temporary accommodation has risen by 6% over the past year, figures have shown.

Statistics from the Department for Communities and Local Government show that nearly 80,000 households, including more than 120,000 children, were homeless in September.

This represents a 65% rise since 2010.

In July to September 2017, the number recognised as homeless by councils rose by more than 15,000.

However, the number being housed in bed and breakfasts was down 23% this year.

The figures show that the problem is spreading outside London. While homelessness in the capital rose by 2% in the year to September, it increased by 15% in the rest of England.

The statistics confirmed that 395 households were made homeless by the Grenfell tower fire in June.

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Media captionHomeless in the countryside: A different view of sleeping rough

The Chartered Institute for Housing said the figures were “a national outrage” and called the increase in the number of households in temporary accommodation “frankly unacceptable”.

“That figure includes more than 2,500 families with children trapped in bed and breakfast accommodation, which is often very poor quality and highly unsuitable,” it added.

According to the figures, local authorities took action to prevent and relieve homelessness for more than 50,000 households between July and September 2017, down 1% compared to the same quarter in 2016.