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Dramatic CCTV of machete-wielding robber stealing £11,000

Dramatic CCTV footage has emerged of an armed robbery outside a Bradford store.

In the footage, a man brandishing a machete can be seen approaching a female G4S driver from behind.

She is then attacked outside a Tesco store in Bradford and is thrown to the ground.

The video shows the offenders making off with a cash box containing more than £11,000.

The footage was released to the Telegraph & Argus after yesterday’s sentencing of a gang who conspired to carry out a spate of “fearsome” robberies on G4S cash-in-transit vans.

As the T&A reported yesterday, security guard Carol Lane was jumped from behind by two men outside the Tesco Express shop on Bolton Road.

She suffered bruising, and said in a victim impact statement that the incident had led her to undergo counselling as she was now “fearful of being out in public on her own.”

The two men then made off to join two others in a waiting Ford Focus car, which was later found burnt out in the Silverhill Road area of Bradford.

The occupants had switched to a Ford Mondeo which they then crashed into a Subaru before ploughing into a garden wall, abandoning the car at the junction of Silverhill Drive and Upper Rushton Road.

One man, Mohammed Shah, 19, was arrested at the scene and a lump hammer, taser, and three empty petrol cans were recovered from the Mondeo.

Officers also later found a machete and £3,480 at Shah’s home address in Stonegate Road, Bradford.

Humza Ali, 19, of Sunnybank Avenue, Thornbury, Bradford, and a 17 year-old youth, who cannot be named, were linked to the car by scientific evidence.

Mr Capstick said that on June 26, Ali and the 17 year-old were arrested alongside Tariq Aziz, 20, of Leeds Road, Bradford, after the trio were seen “acting suspiciously” in a Saab car near the Tesco Express store in Town Street, Stanningley.

A knife and a lump hammer were found in the vehicle, alongside items including tights, a balaclava, and gloves.

Nisha Nadeem, 21, of Woodhall Park Crescent East, Stanningley, was a pharmacy student and former girlfriend of Aziz who worked at the store.

She had provided information to him about when the cash-in-transit vans visited stores in Bradford and Leeds, and admitted a charge of aiding and abetting a robbery.

The other four defendants pleaded guilty to a charge of conspiracy to rob, with Ali also admitting to the possession of heroin in an unrelated incident.

In mitigation submissions, the court heard that none of the gang had admitted wielding the machete or acting as the leader of the group.

In response, Judge Jonathan Rose said: “They all took an equal role, other than the role of organiser.”

Aziz was sentenced to seven years and nine months in a young offender’s institution, with Ali given seven years and eight months.

Shah was sentenced to six years detention, with Nadeem ordered to serve two years.

The 17-year-old youth was detained for five years and four months.

Judge Rose told the gang they had committed “carefully and professionally planned offences.”

On the Bolton Road robbery, he said: “It matters little who wielded the machete, you all agreed it would be used to instil fear into Mrs Lane. It was a fearsome bladed weapon. She was clearly and understandably extremely upset and frightened.

“This was not a single offence, but a conspiracy to commit multiple offences.”

Speaking after the sentencing, detective chief inspector Andrew Howard, of Bradford District Police, said: “This gang planned to carry out a series of robberies on cash-in-transit vans in Bradford and Leeds by using Nadeem’s knowledge of when and where the cash collections would take place.

“The weapons seized in this investigation prove they were prepared to use whatever means necessary to get what they wanted. I would like to thank those who supported our team of detectives with investigating these offences which undoubtedly prevented further incidents and brought these criminals to justice.

“These types of offences are thankfully uncommon and police in Bradford continue to work with organisations who deliver and collect cash across the district to make sure their employees can go about their business in safety.”

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Gang who planned ‘fearsome’ cash-in-transit robberies locked up for nearly 30 years

A GANG who conspired to carry out a spate of “fearsome” robberies on G4S cash-in-transit vans has been locked for a total of nearly 30 years.

In one incident, a female driver was attacked with a machete outside a Tesco store in Bradford, before the offenders made off with a cash box containing more than £11,000.

The group also targeted another Tesco’s in Stanningley but were foiled before reaching the shop.

Prosecutor Tim Capstick told Bradford Crown Court that around 3pm on May 25, security guard Carol Lane was jumped from behind by two men outside the Tesco Express shop on Bolton Road.

CCTV footage showed one of the men carrying a machete, which he held during a struggle in which Mrs Lane was thrown to the floor.

She suffered bruising, and said in a victim impact statement that the incident had led her to undergo counselling as she was now “fearful of being out in public on her own.”

The two men then made off to join two others in a waiting Ford Focus car, which was later found burnt out in the Silverhill Road area of Bradford.

The occupants had switched to a Ford Mondeo which they then crashed into a Subaru before ploughing into a garden wall, abandoning the car at the junction of Silverhill Drive and Upper Rushton Road.

One man, Mohammed Shah, 19, was arrested at the scene and a lump hammer, taser, and three empty petrol cans were recovered from the Mondeo.

Officers also later found a machete and £3,480 at Shah’s home address in Stonegate Road, Bradford.

Humza Ali, 19, of Sunnybank Avenue, Thornbury, Bradford, and a 17 year-old youth, who cannot be named, were linked to the car by scientific evidence.

Mr Capstick said that on June 26, Ali and the 17 year-old were arrested alongside Tariq Aziz, 20, of Leeds Road, Bradford, after the trio were seen “acting suspiciously” in a Saab car near the Tesco Express store in Town Street, Stanningley.

A knife and a lump hammer were found in the vehicle, alongside items including tights, a balaclava, and gloves.

Nisha Nadeem, 21, of Woodhall Park Crescent East, Stanningley, was a pharmacy student and former girlfriend of Aziz who worked at the store.

She had provided information to him about when the cash-in-transit vans visited stores in Bradford and Leeds, and admitted a charge of aiding and abetting a robbery.

The other four defendants pleaded guilty to a charge of conspiracy to rob, with Ali also admitting to the possession of heroin in an unrelated incident.

In mitigation submissions, the court heard that none of the gang had admitted wielding the machete or acting as the leader of the group.

In response, Judge Jonathan Rose said: “They all took an equal role, other than the role of organiser.”

Aziz was sentenced to seven years and nine months in a young offender’s institution, with Ali given seven years and eight months.

Shah was sentenced to six years detention, with Nadeem ordered to serve two years.

The 17-year-old youth was detained for five years and four months.

Judge Rose told the gang they had committed “carefully and professionally planned offences.”

On the Bolton Road robbery, he said: “It matters little who wielded the machete, you all agreed it would be used to instil fear into Mrs Lane. It was a fearsome bladed weapon. She was clearly and understandably extremely upset and frightened.

“This was not a single offence, but a conspiracy to commit multiple offences.”

Speaking after the sentencing, detective chief inspector Andrew Howard, of Bradford District Police, said: “This gang planned to carry out a series of robberies on cash-in-transit vans in Bradford and Leeds by using Nadeem’s knowledge of when and where the cash collections would take place.

“The weapons seized in this investigation prove they were prepared to use whatever means necessary to get what they wanted. I would like to thank those who supported our team of detectives with investigating these offences which undoubtedly prevented further incidents and brought these criminals to justice.

“These types of offences are thankfully uncommon and police in Bradford continue to work with organisations who deliver and collect cash across the district to make sure their employees can go about their business in safety.”

Why do Bradford households recycle less than five years ago?

BRADFORD is recycling less household waste now than it did five years ago, shocking new figures reveal.

Between March 2016 and 2017 37 per cent of all rubbish from households was recycled, reused or composted, 3 per cent less than between the same period from 2011 to 2012.

It is higher than the worst performing council in England and Wales, the east London borough of Newham, which recycled just 14 per cent of its household waste.

But Bradford’s 2017 figure is significantly below the government’s current household waste recycling target of 50 per cent by 2020, set by the EU.

Bradford Council says the reduction in recycling rates is due to the reclassification of certain types of waste.

The latest figures from the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) show that in the 12 months to the end of March this year Bradford cleared away a 231,453 tonnes of rubbish, with 87 per cent of that household waste.

Of the 74,369 tonnes from homes that were recycled or reused, 60 per cent was dry recycling and the rest was compost – food and garden waste.

The 63 per cent that wasn’t recycled either went into landfill or was incinerated, with the ash going towards providing energy. Each household threw out on average 593kg of rubbish that was not reprocessed.

A Bradford Council spokesman said: “The reduction in recycling rate figures for Bradford is the result of a significant proportion of secondary treated waste which was in previous years designated by the Environment Agency as recycled ‘compost like’ waste, being reclassified as ‘landfill’.

“The decline in figures does not reflect a reduction in household recycling.

“In fact, household recycling figures increased by 1,300 tonnes from April to September this year.

“Earlier this year, Bradford Council introduced alternate week recycling/residual waste bin collections which should increase household recycling rates even further.”

The average proportion of household waste recycled in England was 44 per cent, lower than in Wales where 55 per cent was reused.

That puts Wales only second after Germany in the world for recycling household waste, according to environmental analysts Eunomia.

England sits behind South Korea, Slovenia and Italy in 18th place.

Recycling has been on the news agenda lately with David Attenborough’s Blue Planet II shining a light on how plastic is affecting our marine wildlife.

It is thought more than eight million tonnes is dumped into the world’s oceans annually.

Last week China revealed it may stop importing plastic from foreign countries including the UK, which may impact local authorities.

According to the environmental organisation Greenpeace, in the last year Britain shipped more than 2.7 million tonnes to China and Hong Kong.

Experts believe the restrictions could force councils to stop recycling certain types of plastic, as fees at sorting plants are likely to increase.

Church apology over Bishop George Bell abuse inquiry

Bishop George BellImage copyright Getty Images
Image caption George Bell was Bishop of Chichester from 1929 until his death in 1958

The Church of England has apologised to the relatives of a bishop for the way it investigated child abuse claims made against him decades after his death.

Former Bishop of Chichester George Bell, who died in 1958, was alleged to have repeatedly abused a young girl.

She made a formal complaint in 1995 and, 10 years later, won an apology and compensation from the Church.

A report into the handling of the case due to be published later is expected to be critical of the Church’s actions.

Ahead of the publication of Lord Carlile’s report, the current Bishop of Chichester the Right Reverend Martin Warner praised the “dignity and integrity” of Bishop Bell’s accuser, but said the Church inquiry paid “inadequate attention to the rights of those who are dead”.

Image copyright PA
Image caption Lord Carlile will reveal his review’s findings later on Friday

The allegations against George Bell were first made by the victim, known as “Carol”, in 1995, but were not investigated or referred to the police.

She said the bishop began abusing her when she was five and molested her in Chichester Cathedral as she sat listening to stories.

Carol said the abuse continued for about four years.

In 2013 she wrote to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, at which point the matter was referred to the police.

Two years later the Church paid £16,800 in an out of court settlement and apologised to Carol.

However, the “George Bell Group” of supporters of the former bishop sought and gained a review into how the Church arrived at that decision.

Lord Carlile will publish the review’s findings at 10:00 GMT on Friday.

‘Principle of innocence’

In a statement issued on Thursday evening, Bishop Warner said: “We welcome Lord Carlile’s assessment of our processes, and apologise for failures in the work of the Core Group of national and diocesan officers and its inadequate attention to the rights of those who are dead.

“The emotive principle of innocent until proven guilty is a standard by which our actions are judged and we have to ensure as best we can that justice is seen to be done.

“Irrespective of whether she is technically a complainant, survivor, or victim, ‘Carol’ emerges from this report as a person of dignity and integrity.

“It is essential that her right to privacy continues to be fully respected.”

The Church also repeated its apology for failing to report Carol’s allegations to the police when she first came forward in 1995.

Girl says cycle helmets should be compulsory

A year after her life was saved by a cycle helmet, a 12-year-old girl from Hampshire is calling for them to be made compulsory.

Maisie was run over by a car on her way to school in November 2016.

Her pelvis was shattered in five places, and doctors say that her cycle helmet saved her life.

She is now working with road safety officials to promote safe cycling in schools.

Video journalist: Samantha Everett

Unemployment levels fall again

UNEMPLOYMENT has fallen again across Bradford according to the latest figures.

Research by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) shows that 120 fewer people claimed out-of-work benefits in the past month.

The figure for the district has dropped from 8,625 claimants in October to 8,505 in November.

It is the eighth month in a row that unemployment has fallen in Bradford, meaning that 2.6% of people are now registered as out of work.

But this figure remains higher than the regional and national statistics, with 2.2% unemployed for Yorkshire and The Humber and 1.9% for the UK.

The number of people claiming out-of-work benefits fell for every parliamentary constituency in the area, with Bradford West seeing the greatest reduction as 40 fewer people were registered as unemployed than in October.

But Bradford West still had the highest number of jobseekers – 2,610.

Naz Shah, MP for Bradford West, said the figures were not accurate because of changes to unemployment benefits through the Universal Credit scheme.

She said: “The reason for the drop is because of the Universal Credit roll-out. I do not take this as an effective measure of a drop.”

Imran Hussain, MP for Bradford East said: “Whilst I welcome any fall in unemployment, this is an absolutely tiny decline and there are still over 8,000 claimants in the Bradford district, over 2,000 of whom are living in Bradford East.

“Work is also no longer the route out of employment that it should be, with the ONS finding that weekly wages are rising well below the rate of inflation, and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation finding that one in eight of workers in the UK are living in poverty despite having a job.

“Bradford can be a fantastic place to work and has been recognised as one of the top locations to launch new small and medium-sized businesses, but we are still ignored in favour of Leeds and we still have significant hurdles to overcome to encourage growth and get more people into employment, and the Government has to seriously acknowledge the difficulties we face in the North and actually deliver on their Northern Powerhouse plans.”

Shipley had the fewest unemployed residents with 895 claimants, down 15 from last month.

Philip Davies, MP for Shipley, welcomed the news.

He said: “I am delighted about this further significant reduction in unemployment.

“So much for all of those people who said unemployment would go through the roof straight after voting to leave the EU.”

The figures show that the majority of Bradford’s jobseekers – 4,605 people – are aged between 25 and 49.

Tracy Othen, partnership manager at the Manningham Lane Job Centre, said unemployment in the area had dropped by 56% in the past five years.

She said: “Year on year the number of people receiving out-of-work benefits in Bradford has fallen.”

Teacher targets

The claim: The government is missing its teacher recruitment targets.

Reality Check verdict: That’s right. Government figures show that’s been the case for the past 5 years.

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that the government was missing its targets on teacher recruitment.

Her comments came as the regulator, Ofsted, warned of a hardcore of underachieving schools that were struggling to recruit teachers.

Looking at the figures from the Department for Education’s trainee number census, that has certainly been the case for the past five years, although the 2017-18 figures are partly based on forecasts.

The House of Commons Library says that by this measure overall teacher recruitment was above target in each year from 2006-07 to 2011-12 and has been below target in each year since.

The new trainees figure is for the number of initial teacher training (ITT) places.

The target is based on the government’s Teacher Supply Model, which estimates how many teachers need to enter training to meet the needs of state schools, bearing in mind assumptions about what proportion will complete the training and join the state sector.

When you break that down into primary and secondary school teachers, the government has met or very nearly met its primary school target in four of the past five years, with almost all of the shortfall coming from secondary school teacher trainees.

The only subjects in which targets are being met this year are history and physical education, with the biggest shortfall coming in recruiting design and technology teachers.

Responding to the government’s failure to meet its targets, School Standards Minister Nick Gibb said: “The fact that more than 32,000 new trainee teachers have been recruited in a competitive labour market… shows that the profession continues to be an attractive career.”

“Of course, we want these figures to continue to increase, which is why we recently announced generous bursaries and other financial incentives to encourage even more talented trainees to key subjects, such as maths and physics.”

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Pregnant mum in pain rang GP surgery 64 times to get an appointment

A PREGNANT mum in pain rang her GP surgery 64 times in ten minutes to get an appointment.

Jessica Smith, 25, from Horton Bank Top said she was in agony and scared last month when she tried to get through to Horton Bank Top Practice.

But the surgery has pointed out that it has a “queuing phone system” and said people “really should hang on.” 

When Ms Smith went for her appointment later that day, arranged for 2.50pm, she claimed she had to wait until 5pm despite being in torrents of tears.

“A woman turned up who had missed her appointment and was 20 minutes late. She got seen before I did. I couldn’t believe it,” she said.

“It wasn’t the first time I’ve had problems getting an appointment. Getting through to the surgery is a nightmare.”

Ms Smith, who is due to give birth to her second baby any day now, was given the all clear by her GP but it was still a bad experience that should never have happened, she said.

“If I could change things, I’d get GP surgeries to all offer a sit and wait service towards the end of the day. They did that where I used to live down south and it worked well. You had to turn up at 4pm and you might have to sit and wait a long time but at least you’d get seen.”

A spokesman for Horton Bank Top Practice said: “We have a queuing phone system so people really should hang on. We also have an online-booking system so patients can see what availability there is. It’s the nature of the business that doctors do run late sometimes but patients waiting should be kept informed. We do take patient feedback seriously.”

Ms Smith spoke out after a report showed that GP services ‘matter most’ to the Bradford public when it comes to which parts of the NHS need protecting.

Local NHS chiefs commissioned a Big Conversation report to be carried out in July and August this year by Healthwatch Bradford and District to find out what mattered most to local people about the future of health and social care.

The final report, which will be presented to the Bradford Health and Wellbeing Board next week, will be used to help shape the Bradford District and Craven health and care plan for the next five years.

Pupils offer festive cheer to hospice patients

PUPILS from a Baildon school brought some festive cheer to patients at a Bradford hospice.

A group of 13 youngsters, aged between five and 11, from Hoyle Court Primary School handed out 20 Christmas presents to patients at Marie Curie Hospice in Maudsley Street.

The presents were funded by £362 raised at a non-uniform day held at the Fyfe Grove school in aid of Marie Curie in October, where pupils wore yellow.

This fundraiser was the idea of Hoyle Court pupil Benjamin Fisher, nine. His mother Emma Fisher, 36, works as a nurse at the hospice. His brother, and fellow pupil, Samuel, seven, also helped with the fundraising and was also part of the visit.

The brother’s great-grandfather, Alan Edwards, who had lung cancer, was a patient at the hospice in 2015.

Benjamin said: “I hope the presents make the people here happy, because for some of them it might be their last Christmas.

“If it makes them smile, even for a second, that would make me happy.”

Mrs Fisher said she was proud of her sons for their kind-hearted gesture and handed out the gifts with members of the school’s council yesterday.

She said: “I’m so proud of Benjamin for coming up with the idea.

“He remembers visiting his grandad when he was here and how amazing everyone at the hospice was.

“Ever since, he has wanted to give something back and I think this is a lovely way to show his appreciation and make Christmas that much more special for the patients.

“For many, Christmas is a time for spending at home with loved ones.

“However, not everyone has the chance to do that. Some of the patients at the hospice may be too poorly to spend time at home but the children didn’t want them to miss out.”

The gifts were delivered to both in-patients at the hospice and day therapy patients who visit the site each week.

Patient Pamela Bent, 57, said the children’s visit was a pleasant surprise for her.

She said: “I did not expect to get a present, it’s wonderful.

“It’s great that they have given us an early Christmas present.”

Headteacher Tim Phillips said: “We were happy to help out at Christmas.

“If we can add these opportunities for children to get out there in the community and contribute, then that’s fantastic.

“This is about raising awareness of the different lives people lead, particularly at this time of year.

“It shows that there is more to school than reading and arithmetic for the pupils. It’s about making the children feel part of the community and feel they can help make a difference.

“Coming to the hospice makes it real for the children. They have been very mature and understanding about it.”

Fly-tipping prosecutions at record low in England

A lorry fly-tippingImage copyright Bradford Council
Image caption Councils across England report there are over over two thousand incidents of fly-tipping every day

The number of successful prosecutions brought by councils against fly-tippers has fallen to a record low, government figures show.

Local authorities in England secured 1,571 fly-tipping prosecutions in 2016-17, compared to 2,209 in 2007-08, a fall of about a fifth.

The government says councils now have more powers to fine fly-tippers.

The Local Government Association (LGA), which represents councils, wants to see a “more effective legal system”.

There were more than one million fly-tipping incidents in England in 2016-17, equivalent to 114 every hour according to figures published by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).

Whilst the number of fly-tipping incidents has been increasing, the number of successful criminal prosecutions has fallen to a record low.

In comparison, a change in the law has seen the number of fixed penalty notices issued to fly-tippers has more than doubled, with 55,997 notices being handed out in 2016-17 across England.

Paul Castle, the service director for Barnsley Council, said cuts to council budgets and the introduction of fixed penalty notices means local authorities can now take a different approach.

“We have to clear up 400 tons of fly-tipped waste every year which costs us £300,000 a year. I don’t think trying to take every fly-tipper to court works very well. We have a limited amount of time and money and I would say in lots of cases fining people is proving to be an effective deterrent”.

Image copyright Barnsley Council
Image caption Barnsley Council has begun using hidden camera footage to name and shame fly-tippers online

What are the penalties for fly-tipping?

  • Offenders convicted at a Magistrates Court can face a fine of up to £50,000 or 12 months imprisonment
  • If convicted in a Crown Court offenders can be given an unlimited fine and up to five years in prison
  • Councils can now issue fixed penalty notices of between £150 and £400 for small scale fly-tipping offences

Source: House of Commons Library


“Litter and fly-tipping is environmental vandalism,” said Martin Tett, the LGA‘s environment spokesman.

“Clearing up fly-tipping is costing councils more than £57m a year, money that could be spent on other services, like caring for the elderly, protecting children or tackling homelessness”.

He continued: “The government has responded to our call for councils to be able to apply fixed penalty notices for small scale fly-tipping – and this is a big step in the right direction.

“When they take offenders to court, councils need a faster and more effective legal system which means fly-tippers are given hard-hitting fines for more serious offences”.

A Defra spokesman said: “Fly-tipping is an unacceptable blight on our landscape, which is why we have cracked down on offenders by working with the Sentencing Council to strengthen sentencing guidelines and given councils the powers to hand out on-the-spot fines to fly-tippers.

“We have made it easier for vehicles suspected of being used for fly-tipping to be stopped, searched and seized and will continue to work with local partners to stop this inexcusable crime.”