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Tag Archives: England

Police pursuit laws under review as moped crime soars

Metropolitan Police BMW X5 carImage copyright Getty Images

The Home Office is to review the law around police pursuits following a rise in crimes carried out on mopeds.

Police have raised concerns about the potential risk of officers facing charges if a pursuit ends in a crash.

In 2016/17, 28 people died in police pursuit-related incidents.

Policing Minister Nick Hurd said it was vital officers were able to pursue criminals, while the Police Federation of England and Wales hailed the review as a “significant step”.

Figures from the end of last year found crime involving the mopeds, scooters and motorbikes had risen by 600% over two years.

Meanwhile, Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) figures show there were 24 police pursuit-related incidents in 2016/17 in which 28 people died – more than double the 13 deaths in 2015/16.

Crimes such as snatch thefts and acid attacks are often conducted on stolen motorbikes or scooters, and ridden by people without helmets.

Skilled officers

The Home Office review will look at whether current arrangements need to be changed to ensure officers who engage in pursuit have the correct legal protections.

“While it is clearly vital that we protect public safety and that officers are accountable for their actions, it is also important that skilled officers have the confidence to protect the public by pursuing offenders where it is safe to do so,” Mr Hurd said.

At a motorcycle-related crime forum earlier this month, ministers heard there is a perception among the public and some police officers that the police will not pursue suspected offenders riding vehicles at high speeds.

In addition, there is anecdotal evidence that criminals are deliberately removing – or not wearing – helmets because it is wrongly believed that police will not continue a pursuit if that happens.

The Home Office emphasised that there is no ban on the police pursuing motorcyclists who are not wearing helmets.

Momentum gathering

Currently, the conduct of vehicle pursuits is an operational matter for the police and are set out in the College of Policing Authorised Professional Practice (APP)

The APP states pursuit should only be carried out by “pursuit-trained” drivers where “it is in the public interest to protect life, prevent or detect crime, or to apprehend an offender”.

“Staff must discontinue a pursuit as soon as the risk becomes disproportionate to the reasons for undertaking it.”

“Motorcycle and quad bike pursuits clearly present higher risks for suspects than conventional vehicle pursuit,” the APP states.

But adds: “Where such vehicles are used to facilitate serious crime or used repeatedly as the mode of transport for organised crime groups then, to minimise risk to the public from criminality and to secure public confidence in policing, a pursuit may be justified.”

Tim Rogers, from the Police Federation of England and Wales, said: “Momentum has been gathering in recent months and this marks a significant step in bringing about the change we feel is necessary.

“Trained professionals are being judged by the same standards as a member of the public in any normal driving situation with no differentiation in law to recognise the professional training emergency response drivers undertake.”

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How to spot a fake £20 note: warning after fakes seized from Bradford shop

PEOPLE across the district are being warned to be on the lookout for fake bank notes.

Police seized counterfeit £20 notes from a shop in Bradford yesterday.

In total, three notes were confiscated from the premises, one of which is pictured.

The discovery of the fake notes has prompted West Yorkshire Police to issue a wider warning to the public amid fears that more such notes may be in circulation across the district.

The Bradford South policing team said: “Please be vigilant as there may be more in circulation.”

Officers have not revealed which shop the notes were seized from.

Is your £20 note genuine?

The Bank of England says there are eight different signs to look out for to spot fake £20 notes in circulation:

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

1. Check the watermark

When held up to the light, you should be able to see a portrait of the Queen along with a ‘£20’ that’s brighter than the surrounding paper.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

2. Check the holographic strip

The strip on the note should have foil patches that contain alternating holographic images. When you tilt the note, one hologram shows a multi-coloured image of Adam Smith while the other alternates between a multicoloured £ sign and the number 20. The number 20 is also embossed on the strip and should appear just to the right of the Chief Cashier’s signature.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

3. Check the paper and raised print

The note is printed on special paper – check if the note feels right. You should be able to feel raised print on the words Bank of England and around the number 20 in the bottom right corner.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

4. Check under a UV light

Under an ultra-violet light, the number 20 on the front of the note should appear in bright red and green. Random speckles of red and green should also appear on the front and back of the note.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

5. Check the metallic thread

Embedded in every note, this should usually appear as silver dashes down the back of the note but it will show up as a continuous dark line when held up to the light.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

6. Check the print quality

All lines and colours on a genuine note will be sharp, clear and free from smudges or blurred edging.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

7. Check the microlettering

Using a magnifying glass, look closely at the lettering beneath the Queen’s portrait – it will spell out the value of the note in tiny letters and numbers.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

8. Check the see-through pound sign

Held up to the light, you should see a pound sign made up of coloured shapes printed on either side of the note.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

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Fifa to lift ban on poppy following talks with football associations of UK

Scotland and England players wore black armbands with poppy symbols during their World Cup qualifier at Wembley on 17 November

Fifa is set to lift the ban on the poppy following talks with the football associations of the United Kingdom.

Last year, football’s world governing body fined England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland for their use of the poppy to commemorate Armistice day, deeming it to be a political symbol.

England and Scotland wore the emblem on black armbands during their World Cup qualifier at Wembley last November.

Wales and Northern Ireland were fined for displaying it in their stadiums.

The ensuing row drew criticism from the Prime Minister, with Theresa May calling Fifa’s stance “utterly outrageous”.

“Our football players want to recognise and respect those who have given their lives for our safety and security,” she said. “I think it is absolutely right that they should be able to do so.”

Last week Fifa is understood to have sent out a draft proposal to its member nations with revised provisions that could see the poppy permitted if opposing teams and the competition organiser for the relevant match both accept its use in advance.

The new law is expected to be passed in time for November’s international games, which are to be played between 6 and 14 November – a period that incorporates Remembrance weekend.

England are set to play Germany in a friendly at Wembley during this time and it is understood the German FA has no objections over the use of the poppy.

England players are now expected to either wear armbands with a poppy on them or have the poppy embroidered on their shirts in the same way as Premier League teams.

The match will be given the go-ahead provided both countries avoid the World Cup play-offs. To do so, England need to beat Slovenia at Wembley next month to secure automatic promotion while a draw is enough for Germany against Northern Ireland at Windsor Park.

The FA declined to comment until the decision to change the game‘s laws has been fully ratified.

Last year, England and Scotland displayed the poppy on a black armband in an unsuccessful attempt to circumvent the regulations.

That echoed similar actions in 2011 when, under now-departed leadership, Fifa permitted England, Scotland and Wales to use armbands.

Football bosses stopping UK players wearing poppies is utterly outrageous, says PM

The new wording of Fifa’s law tightens the definition of what is deemed a ‘political’ symbol prohibiting:

  • the commemoration of any living or dead person
  • political parties or groups
  • any local or national government
  • discriminatory organisations
  • any group whose aims / actions would offend a notable number of people
  • any specific political act / event

The International Football Association Board (IFAB), the guardian organisation of the sport’s laws, is expected to approve the amendment in early October.

The issue looked likely to be pursued in the courts at one stage after Fifa sanctioned the UK‘s football associations for using the poppy late last year.

Instead, with the prospect of increased fines being levied for repeat offences, negotiations have taken place to find a solution.

The emphasis will now be on competition organisers, such as Uefa and Fifa, to determine if a particular symbol is ‘political’ under the new regulation.

It is believed the fines levied against the UK associations last year will not now need to be paid.

England v West Indies: Moeen Ali hits 53-ball century in Bristol win

Moeen smashes six to reach brilliant century
Third Royal London one-day international, Bristol
England 369-9 (50 overs): Moeen 102 (57), Root 84 (79)
West Indies 245 (39.1 overs): Gayle 94 (78), Plunkett 5-52
England won by 124 runs; lead five-match series 2-0
Scorecard

Moeen Ali hit an exhilarating 53-ball century in England‘s 124-run win over West Indies in the third one-day international in Bristol.

At one stage, Moeen took 61 runs from 14 deliveries to reach the second-fastest ODI ton by an England batsman.

Joe Root earlier made 84 and Ben Stokes 73 in the hosts’ 369-9.

Chris Gayle threatened to lead West Indies to a remarkable run-chase, but after he was run out for 94, the tourists subsided to 245 all out.

The efforts of Moeen and Gayle, coupled with short straight boundaries at both ends of the ground, saw the rope cleared 28 times, a record for an ODI in the UK.

The contest was in the balance when England were pegged back to 217-6, but Moeen shared 117 with Chris Woakes in 88 balls.

That led England to score from which they would take a 2-0 lead in the five-match series, which can be won at The Oval on Wednesday.

That game begins at 12:30 BST, with England naming their squad for the Ashes tour of Australia at 10:00.

Marvellous Moeen makes his mark

Moeen has enjoyed a stellar summer, making 361 runs and taking 30 wickets in the Tests against South Africa and West Indies, but this performance was his most devastating.

Arriving as England lost three wickets for 11 runs, the left-hander was forced into circumspection and had 39 from the first 39 deliveries he faced.

What followed was an awesome display of hitting, the ball constantly landing in the crowd as the West Indies bowlers allowed Moeen to target the on side – seven of his eight maximums went over the leg-side fence.

Moeen took only 12 deliveries to move from 50 to 100 – an ODI record – and, at one point, hit six sixes in eight balls.

He was dropped on 87 by Gayle at point and brought up his third ODI century with consecutive maximums – the 53 balls second only to Jos Buttler’s 46-ball hundred against Pakistan in 2015 in terms of fastest centuries by England batsmen.

Moeen eventually skied a return catch to off-spinner Ashley Nurse, his efforts helping England take 93 runs from the final six overs.

Stokes and Root lay the platform

Golden duck for captain Morgan

Moeen seemed unlikely to get the chance to launch such an assault when Root and Stokes were effortlessly adding 132 for the third wicket.

They also guided England from a position of peril – the hosts were 74-3 after Eoin Morgan edged his first ball behind to continue a poor run of form that has seen him manage only 22 runs in his past nine innings in T20 and 50-over cricket.

Root clipped through mid-wicket and guided behind point, while Stokes targeted mid-on and played sweeps of all kinds against the spinners.

They exposed an error in the Windies’ team selection. A green surface and short boundaries left the leg-spin of Devendra Bishoo looking unnecessary and saw captain Jason Holder turn to the part-time medium-pace of Rovman Powell.

Although Powell made the breakthrough as Stokes sliced to deep cover to begin West Indies’ fightback, then came Moeen’s brilliance.

Gayle threatens to do the improbable

Windies blow as Gayle run out for 94

West Indies’ best hope of pulling off a stunning chase was Gayle, playing in only his second ODI since the 2015 World Cup.

For a while, it seemed possible, with the left-hander smearing the ball behind point, heaving to mid-wicket and chipping Moeen’s off-spin for three successive straight sixes.

But, as he closed in on a century, his lackadaisical attitude to running between the wickets was his undoing as he failed to beat Adil Rashid’s direct-hit from mid-wicket.

By that time, pace bowler Liam Plunkett already had both Shai Hope and Marlon Samuels caught behind, the latter given out on a review despite little evidence to overturn the on-field not-out decision.

Plunkett later had Jason Mohammed caught at deep square leg, Bishoo slice to point and Holder held at long-off for figures of 5-52, his first five-wicket haul in an ODI.

Holder was the last man to fall, the 124-run margin England’s second-largest against West Indies in one-day cricket.

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Police searching for missing 26-year-old man find a body

Cannabis farm found in disused Thornton Road shop