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Dramatic CCTV of machete-wielding robber stealing £11,000

Dramatic CCTV footage has emerged of an armed robbery outside a Bradford store.

In the footage, a man brandishing a machete can be seen approaching a female G4S driver from behind.

She is then attacked outside a Tesco store in Bradford and is thrown to the ground.

The video shows the offenders making off with a cash box containing more than £11,000.

The footage was released to the Telegraph & Argus after yesterday’s sentencing of a gang who conspired to carry out a spate of “fearsome” robberies on G4S cash-in-transit vans.

As the T&A reported yesterday, security guard Carol Lane was jumped from behind by two men outside the Tesco Express shop on Bolton Road.

She suffered bruising, and said in a victim impact statement that the incident had led her to undergo counselling as she was now “fearful of being out in public on her own.”

The two men then made off to join two others in a waiting Ford Focus car, which was later found burnt out in the Silverhill Road area of Bradford.

The occupants had switched to a Ford Mondeo which they then crashed into a Subaru before ploughing into a garden wall, abandoning the car at the junction of Silverhill Drive and Upper Rushton Road.

One man, Mohammed Shah, 19, was arrested at the scene and a lump hammer, taser, and three empty petrol cans were recovered from the Mondeo.

Officers also later found a machete and £3,480 at Shah’s home address in Stonegate Road, Bradford.

Humza Ali, 19, of Sunnybank Avenue, Thornbury, Bradford, and a 17 year-old youth, who cannot be named, were linked to the car by scientific evidence.

Mr Capstick said that on June 26, Ali and the 17 year-old were arrested alongside Tariq Aziz, 20, of Leeds Road, Bradford, after the trio were seen “acting suspiciously” in a Saab car near the Tesco Express store in Town Street, Stanningley.

A knife and a lump hammer were found in the vehicle, alongside items including tights, a balaclava, and gloves.

Nisha Nadeem, 21, of Woodhall Park Crescent East, Stanningley, was a pharmacy student and former girlfriend of Aziz who worked at the store.

She had provided information to him about when the cash-in-transit vans visited stores in Bradford and Leeds, and admitted a charge of aiding and abetting a robbery.

The other four defendants pleaded guilty to a charge of conspiracy to rob, with Ali also admitting to the possession of heroin in an unrelated incident.

In mitigation submissions, the court heard that none of the gang had admitted wielding the machete or acting as the leader of the group.

In response, Judge Jonathan Rose said: “They all took an equal role, other than the role of organiser.”

Aziz was sentenced to seven years and nine months in a young offender’s institution, with Ali given seven years and eight months.

Shah was sentenced to six years detention, with Nadeem ordered to serve two years.

The 17-year-old youth was detained for five years and four months.

Judge Rose told the gang they had committed “carefully and professionally planned offences.”

On the Bolton Road robbery, he said: “It matters little who wielded the machete, you all agreed it would be used to instil fear into Mrs Lane. It was a fearsome bladed weapon. She was clearly and understandably extremely upset and frightened.

“This was not a single offence, but a conspiracy to commit multiple offences.”

Speaking after the sentencing, detective chief inspector Andrew Howard, of Bradford District Police, said: “This gang planned to carry out a series of robberies on cash-in-transit vans in Bradford and Leeds by using Nadeem’s knowledge of when and where the cash collections would take place.

“The weapons seized in this investigation prove they were prepared to use whatever means necessary to get what they wanted. I would like to thank those who supported our team of detectives with investigating these offences which undoubtedly prevented further incidents and brought these criminals to justice.

“These types of offences are thankfully uncommon and police in Bradford continue to work with organisations who deliver and collect cash across the district to make sure their employees can go about their business in safety.”

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Gang who planned ‘fearsome’ cash-in-transit robberies locked up for nearly 30 years

A GANG who conspired to carry out a spate of “fearsome” robberies on G4S cash-in-transit vans has been locked for a total of nearly 30 years.

In one incident, a female driver was attacked with a machete outside a Tesco store in Bradford, before the offenders made off with a cash box containing more than £11,000.

The group also targeted another Tesco’s in Stanningley but were foiled before reaching the shop.

Prosecutor Tim Capstick told Bradford Crown Court that around 3pm on May 25, security guard Carol Lane was jumped from behind by two men outside the Tesco Express shop on Bolton Road.

CCTV footage showed one of the men carrying a machete, which he held during a struggle in which Mrs Lane was thrown to the floor.

She suffered bruising, and said in a victim impact statement that the incident had led her to undergo counselling as she was now “fearful of being out in public on her own.”

The two men then made off to join two others in a waiting Ford Focus car, which was later found burnt out in the Silverhill Road area of Bradford.

The occupants had switched to a Ford Mondeo which they then crashed into a Subaru before ploughing into a garden wall, abandoning the car at the junction of Silverhill Drive and Upper Rushton Road.

One man, Mohammed Shah, 19, was arrested at the scene and a lump hammer, taser, and three empty petrol cans were recovered from the Mondeo.

Officers also later found a machete and £3,480 at Shah’s home address in Stonegate Road, Bradford.

Humza Ali, 19, of Sunnybank Avenue, Thornbury, Bradford, and a 17 year-old youth, who cannot be named, were linked to the car by scientific evidence.

Mr Capstick said that on June 26, Ali and the 17 year-old were arrested alongside Tariq Aziz, 20, of Leeds Road, Bradford, after the trio were seen “acting suspiciously” in a Saab car near the Tesco Express store in Town Street, Stanningley.

A knife and a lump hammer were found in the vehicle, alongside items including tights, a balaclava, and gloves.

Nisha Nadeem, 21, of Woodhall Park Crescent East, Stanningley, was a pharmacy student and former girlfriend of Aziz who worked at the store.

She had provided information to him about when the cash-in-transit vans visited stores in Bradford and Leeds, and admitted a charge of aiding and abetting a robbery.

The other four defendants pleaded guilty to a charge of conspiracy to rob, with Ali also admitting to the possession of heroin in an unrelated incident.

In mitigation submissions, the court heard that none of the gang had admitted wielding the machete or acting as the leader of the group.

In response, Judge Jonathan Rose said: “They all took an equal role, other than the role of organiser.”

Aziz was sentenced to seven years and nine months in a young offender’s institution, with Ali given seven years and eight months.

Shah was sentenced to six years detention, with Nadeem ordered to serve two years.

The 17-year-old youth was detained for five years and four months.

Judge Rose told the gang they had committed “carefully and professionally planned offences.”

On the Bolton Road robbery, he said: “It matters little who wielded the machete, you all agreed it would be used to instil fear into Mrs Lane. It was a fearsome bladed weapon. She was clearly and understandably extremely upset and frightened.

“This was not a single offence, but a conspiracy to commit multiple offences.”

Speaking after the sentencing, detective chief inspector Andrew Howard, of Bradford District Police, said: “This gang planned to carry out a series of robberies on cash-in-transit vans in Bradford and Leeds by using Nadeem’s knowledge of when and where the cash collections would take place.

“The weapons seized in this investigation prove they were prepared to use whatever means necessary to get what they wanted. I would like to thank those who supported our team of detectives with investigating these offences which undoubtedly prevented further incidents and brought these criminals to justice.

“These types of offences are thankfully uncommon and police in Bradford continue to work with organisations who deliver and collect cash across the district to make sure their employees can go about their business in safety.”

Boy, four, left on school bus tried to walk home

John Robertson
Image caption John Robertson tried to make his way home after waking up on a bus in a coach depot

A four-year-old boy tried to walk home from a bus depot after being left on his school bus.

John Robertson was travelling home to North Kessock from Munlochy Primary School on the Black Isle last Friday.

But he did not get off at his stop and ended up in the bus in D&E Coaches’ Inverness Longman depot, about three miles and across the A9’s Kessock Bridge from where he lives.

The boy was spotted close to Inverness Caledonian Thistle’s stadium.

D&E Coaches said it was “extremely disappointed” by the circumstances of the incident. It has dismissed the driver for gross misconduct.

Highland Council and Police Scotland have begun investigations into the incident.

John’s parents, Nikki and John, had thought he was late home because the school bus had been delayed by bad weather.

When he still had not come home, the family said they were told by the bus company that John had been dropped off at home, and then later told that he had not got on the bus.

John’s parents began calling friends, family and police in an effort to find him.

‘Shaken up’

Family and friends also made searches of North Kessock and Munlochy for the youngster.

Mr Robertson told BBC Radio Scotland’s John Beattie programme he was half way through a call to police when officers received information that John had been found and was being taken to a police station.

John told his parents that he had sat on the bus in the depot for a time thinking the bus driver would come back and find him.

Mr Robertson said: “It was a mini bus, so he was able to open the door.

“He decided to get to the Kessock Bridge to get home. He said he crossed a couple of roads. Luckily two teachers found him.

“They said he was shaken up, cold and after some persuasion, because we’ve taught him not to talk to strangers, they managed to get him into their warm car.”

Mr Robertson said he was proud of his son’s actions in cold weather.

‘Very worrying’

A spokeswoman for Highland Council said: “We are extremely concerned about this incident and we are carrying out a full investigation into the circumstances with our contracted school transport provider.

“The incident is also the subject of an ongoing police investigation.”

Earlier Black Isle councillor Gordon Adam told BBC Alba it was a concerning incident.

He said he thought the boy had fallen asleep and woke up at the depot and was not seen by the driver.

“Somehow he got himself to the stadium, which in itself is very worrying as it would have involved crossing a main road,” he added.

D&E Coaches said it had carried out its own investigation of the incident.

A spokesman said: “We are extremely disappointed at the circumstances in which a child was left on one of our minibuses going from Munlochy Primary School to North Kessock last Friday when it was parked in a yard in Inverness.

“A full internal investigation has been conducted and the driver concerned has been dismissed for gross misconduct.

“Relying on an assurance from another pupil that this child was not on the bus is unacceptable.

“All drivers are expected to check their buses at the end of the journey but this clearly did not occur in this instance.”

‘Sincere apologies’

In a response to the incident, the company has introduced a new course on Driver Awareness in School Contracts as part of the accreditation process for a driver licence.

Long-term employees were being given refresher courses.

The spokesman added: “We wish to express our sincere apologies to the family of the child for the distress caused and we are extremely relieved that the child was safe and sound.

“D&E Coaches have been running school contracts for over 20 years and currently have 58 school contracts conveying 3,000 children a day to and from school.

“This is the first time anything of this nature has occurred to mar our excellent record and the new measures will enhance driver vigilance to try to ensure there is never a repeat.”

Ashes: Steve Smith hits 92 not out on second day of third Test

Steve Smith scored a century at the Waca in the 2013-14 series
Third Ashes Test, Waca (day two of five)
England 403 (115.1 overs): Malan 140, Bairstow 119, Starc 4-91
Australia 203-3 (62 overs): Smith 92*, Khawaja 50, Overton 2-46
Scorecard

Captain Steve Smith made an unbeaten 92 as Australia forced their way back into the third Ashes Test on day two in Perth.

Smith’s chanceless and controlled knock took the home side to 203-3, 200 behind England.

Jonny Bairstow earlier completed a century for the tourists, but after Dawid Malan fell for 140, they lost their last six wickets for 35 runs in 51 balls to be 403 all out.

Though Craig Overton removed both openers to leave Australia 55-2, Smith shared 124 with Usman Khawaja, who was dropped twice in his 50.

Khawaja was eventually trapped lbw by Chris Woakes, but Smith remained, making batting look quite effortless in perfect conditions.

England‘s lead is healthy and Australia will have to bat last on a surface showing occasional signs of variable bounce – yet Smith’s continuing presence leaves the hosts with a chance of gaining first-innings parity at least.

With Australia 2-0 up, England must not be beaten at the Waca – a ground where they have not won since 1978 – in order to avoid surrendering the Ashes at the earliest opportunity.

Their efforts in the last hour were hampered by an injury to Overton, who took a blow to the ribs in trying to take a return catch off Khawaja.

Superb Smith guides Australia

Smith had seen David Warner caught behind and Cameron Bancroft pinned leg before, both by the increasingly impressive Overton, when he made his way to the crease with Australia 348 runs behind.

The captain’s unbeaten 141 was the difference between the sides in the hosts’ first Test win in Brisbane and though he was kept relatively quiet at the Adelaide Oval, this was Smith again looking every inch the number one Test batsman in the world.

At the Gabba he favoured the leg side; here he played handsome drives through the off side to go with one pull for six off Overton.

Khawaja, scoring square of the wicket, played the supporting role until he was undone by one from Woakes that skidded and nipped off the seam.

There seemed every chance that Smith would complete a century before the close, but England stopped him from reaching three figures and it is his wicket that they will prize over all others when play gets back under way at 02:30 GMT on Saturday.

He will be joined by Shaun Marsh, who took 18 balls to get off the mark, but is coming off the back of a century of his own in Adelaide.

England engineer their own problems

England celebrate a successful review to remove Cameron Bancroft

As well as Malan batted, the moment that he danced at off-spinner Nathan Lyon, miscued to point and was well held by diving substitute fielder Peter Handscomb can be pinpointed as when Australia began to get back in the game.

From there, the England lower order meekly surrendered – as they have in three of the four previous innings in this series.

Moeen Ali limply poked Pat Cummins to second slip, Woakes helped Josh Hazlewood to long leg and Bairstow played across the line to be bowled by Starc.

Overton patted Hazlewood to short leg and a swiping Stuart Broad top-edged Starc, who ended with 4-91. The final six wickets fell in a little over 45 minutes.

With the ball, England needed Overton to show them the correct length, while James Anderson curiously did not deliver a single ball to Smith until the skipper had reached 47. Moeen has not taken a wicket with his off-breaks since the third day of the first Test.

More costly were the lives given to Khawaja – first by a diving Overton attempting a return catch when the left-hander had not scored, then by second slip Joe Root, who appeared not to see an edge off Woakes when he was on 28.

And, late on, Marsh could have been held off Moeen by either wicketkeeper Bairstow or short leg Mark Stoneman, when the ball flew off the latter’s boot but could not be gathered as both dived for it.

Malan and Bairstow make England history

Jonny Bairstow celebrates his maiden Test century against Australia

The early progress of Malan and Bairstow was as serene as the first evening, when Malan reached his maiden Test century.

From 305-4 overnight, it took them 27 balls to score the first run of the day, after which Malan was once again into his trademark cover-driving.

As he did on Thursday, Bairstow ignored short deliveries and instead waited for anything overpitched to score on both sides of the wicket.

When he reached three figures with a single off Mitchell Marsh, the wicketkeeper celebrated his fourth Test century with a ‘headbutt’ of his helmet, referencing the accusation that he did the same to Bancroft at the beginning of the tour.

The Malan-Bairstow partnership of 237 is an England record for the fifth wicket against Australia and, when they were together, the tourists had the chance to bat themselves into an unbeatable position.

Malan was furious with himself when he gave his wicket to Lyon – rightly so, considering how Australia then turned the tide.

BBC appoints Fran Unsworth as next head of news

Fran Unsworth

Fran Unsworth has been appointed the new BBC director of news and current affairs, replacing James Harding, who is leaving at the beginning of 2018.

Unsworth is currently director of the BBC World Service Group and deputy director of news and current affairs.

She started her BBC career in local radio, before moving to Newsbeat. She went on to become head of political programmes and then newsgathering.

After four years at the BBC, Harding is setting up his own news media venture.

BBC director general Tony Hall described the role as “one of the most demanding of any in broadcasting”, saying he was “delighted she is taking up the role”.

“She brings a combination of excellent news judgement, authority, management knowhow, and the trust of her colleagues both in news and across the BBC,” he added.

Image caption James Harding came to the BBC from The Times newspaper

Unsworth said she was “delighted”, adding: “We are living through a period of significant change at home and abroad. In a complex world, the BBC’s journalism matters more than ever.

“I am proud to lead a team of such dedicated and talented people.”

Unsworth, who will sit on the BBC’s executive committee, will take up the role at the start of the new year.

In the past year she has overseen the biggest expansion of the World Service since the 1940s, adding 12 new global language services including Korean and Pidgin.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email .

Helping young children to read is vital to improving schools

A NEW report by education watchdog Ofsted this week highlighted the fact that more than 130 schools have failed to make any significant progress in more than a decade.

Worryingly for children and parents in this region, 32 of them – the largest number – are in Yorkshire, the Humber and the North-East.

Very often when such statistics are released, under-achieving schools will point to high levels of disadvantaged pupils in their catchment areas as a major cause of their difficulty in showing improvement.

This time, however, Her Majesty’s new chief inspector of education, children’s services and skills, Amanda Spielman, got her response to such arguments in first, warning that the background of children should not be used as an excuse by under-achieving schools.

Ms Spielman said: “There is no doubt that the leadership challenge facing some schools is great.

“But progress is possible and we should all be wary of using the make-up of a school community as an excuse for under-performance.

“I do find myself frustrated with the culture of ‘disadvantage one-upmanship’ that has emerged in some places.”

The report shows that more than 500 primary schools and around 200 secondaries across the country were judged as requiring improvement or being satisfactory at their last two inspections.

Of those inspected in 2016/17, 135 – including around 80 primary and 50 secondary schools – have failed to record a good or outstanding Ofsted inspection since 2005, despite receiving “considerable attention and investment”.

Ms Spielman, who called for more support for struggling schools, said they often had unstable leadership, problems recruiting staff, and high proportions of deprived students.

But, she said: “Schools with all ranges of children can and do succeed.

“Fixating on all the things holding schools back can distract us all from working on the things that take them forward.”

By way of proof, the report highlights improvements at two schools, one of which is Dixons Kings Academy which, as Kings Science Academy, was judged to require improvement in December 2014.

It joined Dixons academy trust in September 2015 and, the report says, its leaders have been “relentless in their pursuit of excellence.”

When the school was reassessed by inspectors in January this year, it was judged to be outstanding.

One factor that emerged clearly from the report is that education has to start early and language skills are right at the top of the list.

All the nursery schools that recorded an “outstanding” inspection rating in 2016/17 had “a very strong focus on early reading, phonics and literacy”.

Among the schools at primary and secondary level that consistently under-performed, “weaknesses in developing literacy across the curriculum” were among their biggest failings, says the Ofsted report.

So where does that leave a district like Bradford, where new research by a literacy charity showed that an estimated 7,800 children aged eight to 18 do not own a single book?

It is no coincidence that the findings, by the National Literacy Trust (NLT), showed that the children most likely not to have a book were from deprived backgrounds. Whether they are from the same deprived backgrounds as the ones being used, as Ofsted puts it, as an “excuse” for some schools’ under-performance, is impossible to work out without a great deal more research but it seems highly likely that this is the case.

In common with other studies, the NLT research suggested that children who don’t own a book do significantly less well on reading tests and are nearly four times less likely to read below the average expected for their age.

Not surprisingly, they also have poorer educational outcomes.

The trust, which has a hub in Bradford where it works with a range of partners to improve literacy levels in the city, has now launched a campaign to help provide the country’s poorest children with their first book this Christmas (see literacytrust.org.uk/donate).

Jonathan Douglas, Director of the Trust, said: “Books have the power to transform children’s lives, which is why it is so alarming to discover that more than 7,000 school children in Bradford don’t have a single book to call their own.

“By donating to the National Literacy Trust this Christmas, you could help give a disadvantaged child their first ever book and set them on the path to a brighter future.”

Such an important initiative clearly deserves widespread support but it’s one thing to own a book, it’s another to learn how to read it.

A YouGov survey in September this year showed that a fifth of parents with children at primary school do not spend any time at all reading with them and more than half of parents with children aged five to 11 spend less than an hour a week reading to them.

All of which begs two big questions: if the Government wants to improve school performance, why doesn’t it give free books to every disadvantaged child? And why doesn’t it do more to educate parents in the vital importance of helping their children to read?

Surely, in the long run, it would be a cheaper and more effective way to provide a better education for our children than the millions spent trying to catch up when they’re older….

Virgin Trains staff to hold 24-hour strike

Virgin TrainImage copyright PA
Image caption RMT and TSSA members will walkout for 24 hours

Virgin rail workers are to go on a 24-hour strike later in the first of a number of walkouts across the UK.

Rail, Maritime and Transport union and Transport Salaried Staffs Association members on Virgin Trains West Coast will strike over pay and staffing.

Virgin said it had offered a “significantly above inflation pay rise”, but unions rejected it.

Most Virgin West Coast services will still run, but Chester and north Wales will not be served for most of the day.

A replacement bus service will be laid on between Chester and Crewe, and Arriva Trains Wales will accept tickets between Chester and north Wales stations.

There will also be no trains to Edinburgh.

Passengers have been warned to check their travel arrangements before heading to the station and to expect the services that are running to be busier than normal.

Further strikes are planned on Virgin West Coast services on 22 December and throughout January.

RMT members are also staging action on Merseyrail, Greater Anglia, South Western Railway and CrossCountry rail in the coming weeks.

Why are the unions striking?

Both the RMT and the TSSA said the dispute is over drivers being offered higher pay rises than other staff on the network.

Manuel Cortes, general secretary of TSSA, said: “We’re obviously happy for the drivers that they have had a decent settlement, but our members believe that they too should deserve a little more than a stand still inflation pay rise.”

RMT general secretary Mick Cash said: “We have made it clear to the company that the inequality and underhanded approach of Virgin will be fought tooth and nail.”

What does Virgin say?

Phil Whittingham, managing director for Virgin Trains on the West Coast, said the company had spoken to the unions about a 3.6% pay rise – but they want 4%.

He claims that is double the 2% national average seen across the UK this year.

“We remain open to talks with the RMT and TSSA, and urge them to call off these strikes which will cost their members pay for no gain,” he said.

Morrisons to revive orange Christmas tradition with giveaway

Morrisons is aiming to revive the almost forgotten tradition of putting an orange into a Christmas stocking by giving 200,000 oranges to parents across the country and encouraging them to tell the story behind it ahead of Christmas Eve. This initiative is

Morrisons is aiming to revive the almost forgotten tradition of putting an orange into a Christmas stocking by giving 200,000 oranges to parents across the country and encouraging them to tell the story behind it ahead of Christmas Eve. This initiative is

Bradford leaps 15 places in national rankings for primary results

BRADFORD has jumped 15 places in the national league tables for primary school results, according to new figures.

However, despite the good progress, Bradford still remains towards the bottom end of the table of best performing local authority areas, up from 139th in 2016, when Bradford was the joint fifth worst performer, to 124th this year.

The official Key Stage 2 figures for 2017 were released by the Department for Education yesterday, and show that children in Bradford are making better progress in reading, writing and maths during their primary school education than pupils in most areas of Yorkshire.

The data shows that Bradford has the joint highest score in the Yorkshire region for the progress being made in maths and the third highest score for the progress being made in reading and writing, out of the 15 education authority areas.

Across Bradford 57 per cent of 11-year-old pupils reached or bettered the expected standard in reading, writing and maths. This was an increase of ten per cent on 2015/16 and closes the gap with the national average by two per cent. Nationally 61 per cent of pupils achieved this.

Two-thirds of Bradford pupils (66 per cent) are reaching the expected standard in reading, an increase of nine per cent on 2016.

The data also shows that a number of Bradford schools failed to meet the government’s “floor standard.” Schools are considered to be under-performing if fewer than 65 per cent of pupils reach the expected standard in reading, writing and maths, or if they fail to make sufficient progress in these areas.

Local schools that failed to meet this target were Fearnville Primary School in Tyersal, Lister Primary School in Manningham, Parkland Primary School in Greengates, Nessfield Primary School in Keighley, Oldfield Primary School in Keighley and Pudsey Tyersal Primary School.

The top performing school in the district based on based on the percentage of pupils reaching the expected standard in reading, writing and maths was Burley and Woodhead CofE Primary School.

Councillor Imran Khan, Bradford Council’s Executive Member for Education, Employment and Skills said: “There are very encouraging signs in this latest set of league tables which show that our pupils are making good progress during their primary school education.

“We know that we have more to do to ensure Bradford closes the gap with the national average but all the signs are there that we are in the process of doing this.

“We have lots of excellent work taking place across our primary schools. We support and challenge schools where this is necessary and will do everything we can to ensure Bradford pupils have access to the best possible education.”

Why was the black ice so bad on Thursday morning?

The black ice that caused crash chaos in Bradford this morning took many by surprise, coming as it did on the back of what had not seemed, on the face of it, a particularly cold night.

But the Met Office, which issued a yellow warning for ice overnight, has explained that the warmer air was a factor in creating the unusually slippery conditions.

A spokesman said: “Black ice forms on pavements and roads when the ground temperature is below freezing and when the air temperature is higher.

“It is caused when drizzle or rain hits the cold ground and freezes.

“During situations when the ground cools quicker or is colder than the air, a ground frost can occur without an air frost.

“Due to its transparent nature black ice can be mistaken for a wet surface and so can be highly dangerous.”

The bad news is that there is another yellow warning for ice in place for overnight Thursday into Friday.

The spokesman said: “Once again, ice will be a hazard in places through this period. This will happen as heavy showers of rain, hail, sleet and snow alternate with clearer periods, allowing temperatures to dip sharply.”

They added: “As a consequence, icy stretches are likely on untreated roads, pavements and cycle paths with some slippery surfaces likely.”

A Bradford Council spokesperson said: “Our gritting crews were out gritting our Priority One routes across the district from 7pm last night and a full Priority One grit took place from around 4am this morning.

“On a Priority One grit, our guys are out in the freezing weather, covering around 700 miles of road trying their best to keep them clear. We treat over 60% of the roads in the district, which is more than any other council area in West Yorkshire.

“It is not feasible to grit all roads in the district or to respond to all requests from residents, of which we have had nearly 1000 a day in past week. Therefore we concentrate on main roads, bus routes, routes to hospitals, schools, isolated communities and ambulance, police and fire stations first.

“Once these Priority One routes are treated, our highways service starts gritting lower priority roads such as side roads and lanes.

“Grit can only do so much and there were particular issues this morning due to rain washing away grit that had been spread, before further rain came and froze on contact with road and pavement surfaces causing black ice.

“We would urge people to take extra care in winter weather, fit winter tyres to their vehicle, and allow extra time, plan journeys in advance by checking which routes are on grit runs and sticking to them.

“We would encourage people to help out in their neighbourhood by gritting their own street where they can.”