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Category Archives: CBN

Media Not Letting Up on Trump Over Charlottesville Response

President Donald Trump fielded questions in a combative news conference Tuesday afternoon that was suppose to cover new infrastructure initiatives for America.

When asked why he didn’t identify the violence as “white supremacy” in his original statement, Trump explained that details have to come from investigations before specific motives can be identified.

“I don’t want to go make a statement for the sake of making a political statement, I want to know the facts.”

Trump continued to received similar questions and responded by vehemently condemning both sides as violent, citing images of the left also rushing with weapons. 

“What about the alt-left who came charging at the alt-right. Do they have any semblance of guilt? What about the fact that they came charging with clubs in their hands swinging?”

Trump took a similar stance as former President Obama. In 2015 Dylan Roof shot and killed 9 black individuals in a historic church in Charleston, South Carolina. While Obama did make an immediate statement condemning the violence, he refused to call it terrorism because the motive of Roof wasn’t immediately clear. Terrorism is often used as hyperbole when it actually carries a specific definition, specific to a political agenda. 

Both presidents took immediate action in vehemently speaking out against the violence but waited for a formal identity of the type of crime until the investigation revealed details. 

Trump also referenced who should have the authority to take down historic confederate statues. 

“I would say that should be up to the local government…local communities.”

Infrastructure: The Original Topic of the News Conference

Trump did talk about the nation’s infrastructure before things got out of control.

He presented numbers on the current economic status in America, followed by a description of his recently signed executive order. Trump described the current status as poor.

“We’re literally like a third-world country.”

Trump continued to show optimism for what was to come.

“We will create millions of job and make many American’s dreams come true.”

The purpose of this particular executive order is to expedite the permit process for constructing roads, waterways, bridges, and other infrastructure-related developments. Trump continued to reference the billions of dollars that are spent during the red-tape process and acknowledged that safety upgrades are also put on hold pending permits, something that costs the American people their safety and welfare. 

Multi-agency projects will be required to select one agency as the lead to streamline the permit process, according to the executive order. 
 

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‘Answered Prayer’: Pastor Released from North Korea Welcomed Home

Rev. Hyeon Soo Lim, the Canadian pastor who spent two years at hard labor in a North Korea prison camp, received a joyous welcome home from his church Sunday.

Rev. Lim told the crowd at Light Presbyterian Church in Mississauga, Ontario that it was a “miracle” for him to be there, the Canadian Press reports.   

Mr. Lim, 62, was sentenced to life in prison with hard labor in December, 2015, for what the North Korean supreme court deemed, “crimes against the state.”

On August 9th, Mr. Lim was freed on “sick bail” after a Canadian delegation, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s national security adviser, visited the country to ask for his release.

Mr. Lim recounted that for more than two years, he was forced to dig holes in the frozen ground, read North Korean propaganda, endured frostbite, isolation, hunger and severe loneliness.  

According to the article, waves of sobs and tears moved through the packed crowd at the evangelical church in Mississauga where Mr. Lim spoke at a service on Sunday afternoon.

It was his first public appearance since his release. Mr. Lim told congregants that during the winter “the ground was frozen, the mud was so hard that it took two days to dig one hole.  It was incredibly challenging.  My fingers and toes were frostbitten.”

Mr. Lim called his release a “miracle” and said, “I always knew Canada was a very warm and compassionate nation, but through my ordeal I really began to grasp that very deeply.”

Congregants say the two years behind bars took a heavy physical toll on their pastor who was looked quite different because of drastic weight loss.  Mr. Lim was hospitalized four times while imprisoned with various ailments.  He said his release was sudden, with his guards only giving him a 15-minute warning that Canadian authorities were coming to get him.

Congregants say their prayers were answered.  “We’ve been waiting for this moment to come and he looks healthier than many of us expected.”  It’s not yet known whether Mr. Lim will return to the pulpit at his home church in Canada.

Franklin Graham Defends President Trump, Slams Satan for Charlottesville Chaos

Franklin Graham defended Donald Trump from critics that placed blame on him for the deadly riots in Charlottesville, Virginia, that occurred over the weekend. 

Graham instead said that the blame is on Satan. 

The driver James Alex Fields Jr., 20, an alleged Nazi sympathizer, plowed a car into a crowd of activists in Charlottesville, and ended up killing one person and injuring 19. 

CNN is painting the picture of President Trump being insincere when he condemned the riots. 

“Some heard the diluted words of a man forced to bow to media pressure, while others found winking encouragement in between the lines,” reporter AJ Willingham from CNN.

“When he says ‘all sides,’ they hear vindication,” the reporter insinuated about the white supremacists. 

Franklin Graham condemned the media’s blame game, stating on Facebook: 

“Shame on the politicians who are trying to push blame on President Trump for what happened in #Charlottesville, VA. That’s absurd. What about the politicians such as the city council who voted to remove a memorial that had been in place since 1924, regardless of the possible repercussions? How about the city politicians who issued the permit for the lawful demonstration to defend the statue? And why didn’t the mayor or the governor see that a powder keg was about to explode and stop it before it got started?” 

“Instead they want to blame President Donald J. Trump for everything. Really, this boils down to evil in people‘s hearts. Satan is behind it all. He wants division, he wants unrest, he wants violence and hatred. He’s the enemy of peace and unity. I denounce bigotry and racism of every form, be it black, white or any other. My prayer is that our nation will come together. We are stronger together, and our answers lie in turning to God,” Graham added.

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Col., says it is the time to place blame on Trump. 

“This isn’t a time for innuendo or to allow room to be read between the lines. This is a time to lay blame,” said Gardner on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday.

“This president has done an incredible job of naming terrorism around the globe as evil,” he continued. “He has said and called it out time and time again. And this president needs to do exactly that today,” he added. 

Charlottesville mayor Michael Signer also said on the same program that Trump courted white supremacists in his presidential campaign which caused them to start acting out publicly. 

“Look at the intentional courting both, on the one hand, of all these white supremacists, white nationalist groups like that, anti-Semitic groups,” Signer said. “And then look on the other hand, the repeated failure to step up, condemn, denounce, silence, you know, put to bed all those different efforts.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the attack ‘meets the definition of terrorism in our statute.’ 

Vice President Mike Pence also denounced white supremacists on Sunday. 

 “These dangerous fringe groups have no place in American public life and in the American debate, and we condemn them in the strongest possible terms,” he said.

40-years after His Death You Can Read Elvis’s Bible, Including Handwritten Notes

Elvis Presley is known as the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll but it was gospel music that had the greatest influence on his life.

“Throughout his career he kept returning to gospel,” said Charles Hughes, who writes about Southern music and history. “Singing gospel songs, recording gospel records and incorporating in his live shows performance techniques that he would have gotten from the church.”

Joe Moscheo, a member of The Imperials, a Gospel group that traveled with Elvis, wrote a book called, “The Gospel Side of Elvis” in 2007. Around that time, he spoke with CBN‘s Scott Ross about the singer’s faith.

Moscheo, who died in 2016, told Ross that he remembers how Elvis would gather other singers in his hotel room to sing Gospel music for hours.

“That’s what he wanted to do. It was like there were two parts, there was Elvis the superstar and he went out onstage in his jumpsuits and then he came offstage and he was Elvis Presley from Tupelo, Mississippi, that was brought up in the church and he wanted to sing Gospel music,” he said.

The Imperials toured with Elvis from 1969-1972 and recorded two Gospel albums with him, including his final Grammy-winning record, “He Touched Me.”

The last time he saw Elvis, he gave him a Bible.

“I said, ‘Elvis, I’ve got something for you…I know you’re struggling and I know you’re having a hard time, but every answer you need is in this book. So, all you have to do is read it.”

Ross asked Moscheo if he believed Elvis had a relationship with Jesus Christ and was saved.

“I believe that he was,” Moscheo said.

“He had demons. I mean, he had problems. I mean, it’s really hard to imagine that a guy that was Elvis Presley could be without that. But, from all these indications and just being around him in these intimate settings I really feel that he was a Christian. I really do. And, I felt that he was trying as hard as he could. He was holding on as hard as he could and I hope to see him one day,” Moscheo told Ross.

The singer’s Bible provides a deeper look into his faith–and thanks to the Museum of the Bible–fans will have the opportunity to do just that.

Norm Conrad is the Curator of American and Biblical Imprints for the Museum of the Bible. He told CBN News he’s convinced the Bible belonged to Elvis because the notes are in the singer’s handwriting.

“You can tell this is his personal Bible,” Conrad said.

It was given to him by his aunt and uncle on his first Christmas at Graceland, his Memphis home, in 1957.

Conrad said the underlines and notes reflect themes of trusting God. “They definitely lean to ‘I will trust God. I can trust God. God’s in control.'”

While not an expert on Elvis, Conrad believes the writings show show the singer was a believer.

“If he was not a man of faith, then he was a man seeking a relationship with God. I believe both. I believe he was a man of faith. My gut tells me that,” Conrad explained.

The museum has an exciting new YouVersion study plan allowing users to read through the KJV Bible that once belonged to Elvis.

YouVersion is a free Bible app for your phone, tablet and computer.

Museum of the Bible’s newest YouVersion reading plan, Rockin’ Through the Psalms with the “King,” invites readers to take part in a seven-day study through Elvis’ KJV Bible, including his own handwritten notes and underlined verses.

For example, below Psalm 11:1, Elvis wrote, “In the Lord I place my trust and He will guide me.”

Psalm 43:3 is underlined with a note at the top of the page reading, “Lord send me light to guide me.”

Jotted at the bottom of page 670, in reference to Psalm 137:5-9, are the words, “Trust in the Lord, not man.”

“Celebrities don’t get much bigger than Elvis Presley,” said Steven Bickley, Museum of the Bible vice president of marketing.

“He is a prime example of the unparalleled influence of this book. His life may have taken a few twists and turns along the way, but it’s clear, as evidenced by his own handwritten notes, that the Bible had a profound impact on him,” said Bickley.

It’s apparent that Elvis looked to the Bible for inspiration for his music.

Jotted below Psalm 81, Elvis wrote, “Sing the Lord Praises.”

In reference to Psalm 149:3-6, it reads, “The highest graces of music flow from the feelings of the heart-soul.”

Various other phrases and words are also underlined in Psalm 149 with the words, “Sing for the Glory of God,” written in Elvis’ handwriting at the end of the Book of Psalms.

The Elvis study can be accessed through the YouVersion Bible app.

Photographs of the Elvis Presley Bible are included with permission from their owner.

‘In the Name of Jesus, You Shall Live’: Family Prays for Police Officer Shot by Gunman

A routine service call for one South Carolina police officer could have turned deadly had it not been for the quick response of a bystander and the prayers of his family. 

Estill police officer Quincy Smith was responding to a service call on New Year’s Day in 2016.

Someone called reporting a suspicious man who was trying to steal items from a nearby grocery store.

Smith arrived on the scene and approached 29-year-old Malcolm Orr. 

The entire incident was caught on a pair of camera glasses Smith was wearing.

The video can be found on You Tube. CBN News made the editorial decision not to publish it due to the disturbing nature of the video  – which includes Smith being shot.

Orr can be seen with one hand in his pocket while talking on his cell phone.

“Come here for a second. Come here! You better stop — if you don’t,” Smith warns in the video.

But instead of stopping, Orr opens fire on Smith hitting him four times in the neck, hip, and arm. 

Bullets broke two bones in Smith’s arm, severed a vein in his neck, and passed through his upper torso, the Charlotte Observer reports.

Smith immediately went down from his injuries but managed to crawl his way to his patrol car.

“Dispatch, please tell my family I love them,” he said over the radio.

A man later identified as John Tompkins came to Smith’s rescue. Tompkins was completing construction work on the convenience store behind where the incident happened. 

“He came to my aid and helped me,” the officer said.”He stayed there with me. At the time I did not think I would make it off the road that day because of the severe injuries that I had. Especially from the neck wound.” He stayed there and comforted me and gave me a little bit of hope.”

Two of his family members later came to the scene just before the ambulance arrived.

“In the name of Jesus, you shall live,” one woman, a family member, can be heard yelling in prayer as she cried out to Jesus for Smith.

Smith told reporters that he is thankful for the prayers of his family members, the help of Tompkins and the $30 he spent on the glasses, according to CBS News.

Solicitor Duffie Stone announced last week that a jury found Orr guilty of attempted murder and possessing a weapon in a violent crime. Orr has been sentenced to 35 years in jail.

“If but not for the grace of God and some very good doctors, this would not only have been a murder case but a death penalty case,” Stone said in a statement last week

Smith said he is feeling a lot better since the incident and is making progress.

“I’m doing a whole lot better,” he said. “Still out of work for medical leave, still participating in therapy getting my bones and muscles back proper for work.”

CBN News has reached out to officer Smith but has yet to receive a response.

Alveda King: Monuments Belong in Museums

Dr. Alveda King, the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said watching events unfold in Charlottesville last weekend felt very familiar.

“It’s almost like in a way deja vu with me being 67 years old and having lived through the civil rights movement. I’m very familiar with that energy,” she said.

King’s father. Rev. A.D. King, was a civil rights activist alongside Dr. Martin Luther King. Alveda remembers her Birmingham family home being bombed as well as her father’s church office in Louisville, Kentucky. During the open housing movement she spent time in jail.

King’s take on Charlottesville: “It’s easy to accomplish dark deeds in the midst of chaos.” Her response? “I immediately began to pray.”

King says the week-end further exposed the white supremacist movement for what it is and she believes that’s a positive outcome.

She agrees with a number of other black conservative leaders who are defending the president’s response to Charlottesville. At a press conference at the National Press Club on Monday leaders from CURE, a conservative policy group, rejected a question from reporters implying that the president is responsible for the country’s racial divide.

The Christian Post reports that Rev. Derek McCoy, the head of the CURE National Clergy Network responded, “You are saying that the president is the instigator and I think that is absolutely wrong.”

King told CBN News she supports the president’s response to Charlottesville. She said after initial broad comments he gave a more targeted response, specifically condemning white supremacists and the KKK and neo-Nazis. That’s in line historically she said with how presidents have responded to difficult events over the years.

King says the debate over where Confederate monuments belong has a simple answer: in museums.

“You don’t erase someone’s history,” she told CBN News, but added “history lessons must always accompany these statues and images.”

Star Parker, the president of CURE, told Fox News that she finds it ironic that liberals are calling for Confederate flags to come down when they want to raise rainbow flags symbolizing the LGBTQ movement. “These two flags represent the exact same thing,” she said “that certain people groups are not welcome here.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/star-parker-confederate-pride-flag-f…

Alveda King: These Riots Are Deja Vu, the Monuments Belong in Museums

Dr. Alveda King, the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., said watching events unfold in Charlottesville last weekend felt very familiar.

“It’s almost like in a way deja vu with me being 67 years old and having lived through the civil rights movement. I’m very familiar with that energy,” she said.

King’s father. Rev. A.D. King, was a civil rights activist alongside Dr. Martin Luther King. Alveda remembers her Birmingham family home being bombed as well as her father’s church office in Louisville, Kentucky. During the open housing movement she spent time in jail.

King’s take on Charlottesville: “It’s easy to accomplish dark deeds in the midst of chaos.” Her response? “I immediately began to pray.”

King says the week-end further exposed the white supremacist movement for what it is and she believes that’s a positive outcome.

She agrees with a number of other black conservative leaders who are defending the president’s response to Charlottesville. At a press conference at the National Press Club on Monday leaders from CURE, a conservative policy group, rejected a question from reporters implying that the president is responsible for the country’s racial divide.

The Christian Post reports that Rev. Derek McCoy, the head of the CURE National Clergy Network responded, “You are saying that the president is the instigator and I think that is absolutely wrong.”

King told CBN News she supports the president’s response to Charlottesville. She said after initial broad comments he gave a more targeted response, specifically condemning white supremacists and the KKK and neo-Nazis. That’s in line historically she said with how presidents have responded to difficult events over the years.

King says the debate over where Confederate monuments belong has a simple answer: in museums.

“You don’t erase someone’s history,” she told CBN News, but added “history lessons must always accompany these statues and images.”

Star Parker, the president of CURE, told Fox News that she finds it ironic that liberals are calling for Confederate flags to come down when they want to raise rainbow flags symbolizing the LGBTQ movement. “These two flags represent the exact same thing,” she said “that certain people groups are not welcome here.”

‘We have to pray, then we have to act’

Washington – Bishop Harry Jackson believes President Trump wants to take action to help the country heal problems with race in America. This after Trump called out the kkk, neo natzis and white supremacists saying racism is evil. 

“I was glad he spoke out so specifically, the whole issue has become more about what the President said or didn’t say,” said Bishop Jackson.  “I think there is a wrong misdirection than what’s the root of the race problem that were experiencing in America today.”

Bishop Jackson is pastor of Hope Christian Church in Beltsville, Maryland, head of the High Impact Leadership Coalition, and a member of Trump’s evangelical advisory board. Bishop Jackson believes the church must come together to work on immediate, intermediate and a long term strategy to deal with racial tensions.

“The Lord is saying to us as the Church I need you to deal with this now,” said Bishop Jackson “I believe God wants us to begin to address first the disunity in the church and have the church lead the way to deal with the longer term issues such as educational gap, unemployment, criminal justice reform.”

Bishop Jackson also talked about the importance of prayer when sitting down with CBN on Facebook live. 

“We need to pray according to 1st Timothy, chapter 1 where we are going to pray for those with authority, that we might live a quiet and peaceful life,” said Bishop Jackson. 

He added that the church must also come together on education reform, family intervention and bringing jobs to low income areas. 

The Charlottesville Call to Action: ‘We Have to Pray, Then We Have to Act’

WASHINGTON – Bishop Harry Jackson believes President Trump wants to take action to help the country heal problems with race in America. This after Trump called out the KKK, neo-Nazis and white supremacists saying “racism is evil.”

“I was glad he spoke out so specifically, the whole issue has become more about what the President said or didn’t say,” said Bishop Jackson.  “I think there is a wrong misdirection than what’s the root of the race problem that were experiencing in America today.”

Bishop Jackson is pastor of Hope Christian Church in Beltsville, Maryland, head of the High Impact Leadership Coalition, and a member of Trump’s evangelical advisory board. Bishop Jackson believes the church must come together to work on immediate, intermediate and a long-term strategy to deal with racial tensions.

“The Lord is saying to us as the Church I need you to deal with this now,” said Bishop Jackson. “I believe God wants us to begin to address first the disunity in the church and have the church lead the way to deal with the longer term issues such as educational gap, unemployment, criminal justice reform.”

Bishop Jackson also talked about the importance of prayer when sitting down with CBN on Facebook live. 

“We need to pray according to 1st Timothy, chapter 1 where we are going to pray for those with authority, that we might live a quiet and peaceful life,” said Bishop Jackson. 

He added that the church must also come together on education reform, family intervention and bringing jobs to low income areas. 

‘I Looked to God’: Facebook Exec Recalls How God Helped Through Time of Grief

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg recently opened up about the death of her husband and how she relied on God to help her grieve.

Sandberg sat down with mega church pastor Billy Hybels Thursday at at Willow Creek Community Church’s annual Global Leadership Summit to discuss how the trauma changed her. 

“It felt like the grief would never end. I turned to my friends,” she explained, recalling how her husband suddenly died in 2015 after falling off a treadmill during a vacation with family and friends.

Her husband’s sudden death after 11 years of marriage meant she had to raise two children on her own.

“I turned to other people‘s experiences. I looked to God for comfort, I looked to tradition. And sometimes it worked and sometimes it just didn’t,” Sandberg said. 

Now, Sandberg is helping others deal with their grief. She co-authored a book called Option B.

She says she had to learn how to live life while carrying immense grief. Sanberg says she had to learn how to become resilient.

“I had no choice but to wake up every day. No choice but to get through the shock, the grief, the survivor guilt, no choice but to try and move forward and be a good mother at home. No choice but to try and focus and be a good colleague at work,” Sandberg writes in the book. “To fight for change tomorrow we need to build resilience today.” 

While Sandberg admits she does not have all the answers, she hopes her experience will help people.

“I’m still finding my way through and learning many of the lessons included here. Like so many who’ve experienced tragedy, I hope I can choose meaning and even joy — and help others do the same,” she writes.