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Category Archives: Dailymail

Britain needs another 190k extra care home places by 2035

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Indian woman beaten by her family who say she’s a witch

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Lab-grown mini brains could help to treat autism

Scientists could soon grow mini-brains by snapping together living parts like building blocks thanks to a newly developed technique.

Researchers have created pea-sized ‘organoids’ – distinct, three-dimensional replicas of regions of the brain.

These regions can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops.

Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia.

Scroll down for video

Scientists could soon grow mini-brains by snapping together living parts like building blocks thanks to a newly developed technique. This sped-up animation shows the connecting cells of two ‘organoids’ created by researchers (credit: Yale University)

MINI-BRAINS 

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The mini-brains in existence today are a long way from the complexity of a real brain, meaning their use in research is limited.

Scientists have also had problems with consistency, finding that each organ rarely grows in the same way even when developed using the same growth protocols and starting materials.

A new mini-brain growth technique using small ‘organoids’ allows for highly replicable modules of developing brain parts to be snapped together like building blocks.

The team, from Yale University in Connecticut, say this technique could allow for a higher level of mini-brain complexity and consistency.

The researchers, from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, used stem cells to create and fuse two types of organoids from different brain regions.

They did this to show how the developing brain maintains proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

A failure to maintain this balance has been linked with a host of developmental brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

‘The inhibitory neurons migrate from specific areas of the embryonic brain to the region where excitatory neurons are being produced,’ said study lead author Dr In-Hyun Park.

‘What we did is to fuse these two areas and watched the process unfold.’

The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (MGE).

The MGE produces inhibitory neurons and plays a crucial but brief role in early development of the brain’s cortex region.

By merging this structure with another that produces excitatory neurons they were able to track the movement of the inhibitory cells.

These provide a crucial ‘brake’ on excitatory neurons and so are needed to stop the development of several serious conditions linked to brain over-activity.

Understanding the process will not only help researchers study how the brain evolved, but also shed light on how imbalances contribute to many neurological disorders.

 The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (pictured)

 The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (pictured)

 The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (pictured)

This animation shows a cerebral organoid, or mini-brain, grown in a laboratory. It contains a diversity of cell types and internal structures that can make it a good stand-in for an actual brain in experiments (credit: Brown University)  

For instance, excess excitatory neuron activity has been linked to schizophrenia, while too much inhibitory neuronal activity may cause depression.

Evidence suggests that in these conditions, Dr Park told Quanta: ‘There seems to be an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neural activity.

‘So those diseases can be studied using the current model that we’ve developed.’ 

The imbalance has also been linked to development of autism spectrum disorders, he said.

The organoids can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops. Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia (stock image)

The organoids can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops. Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia (stock image)

The organoids can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops. Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia (stock image)

The mini-brains in existence today are a long way from the complexity of a real brain, meaning their use in research is limited.

Scientists have also had problems with consistency, finding that the organs rarely grow uniformly even when developed using the same growth protocols and starting materials.

But the new organoid technique allows for highly replicable modules of developing brain parts to be snapped together like building blocks.

The Yale team suggest this technique could one day allow for a higher level of mini-brain complexity and consistency.

International Garden Photographer of the Year winners

From a stunning shot of a hawkmoth’s eye to a beautiful closeup of a carrot: Winners of the 2017 International Garden Photographer of the Year competition are revealed

  • The winner was announced alongside 21 other finalists from across the world 
  • The contest has previously seen winning images from China, Australia, and the UK
  • This year‘s winner is UK-based professional photographer Stephen Studd, with his close-up study of a giant carrot

The 2017 International Garden Photographer of the Year (IGPOTY) winner has been revealed alongside 21 other beautiful macro snaps of garden objects and wildlife from across the world.

The contest, which closed for entries on June 30, has previously seen winning images from China, Australia, the Netherlands, France, Hungary, Italy, New Zealand, Trinidad and Tobago and the UK.

The images include a beautiful snap of a caterpillar as it begins its cocooning process in New Zealand, and a detailed closeup of an ‘ice flower’ in Zala County, Hungary.

The winner of this year‘s prize is UK-based professional photographer Stephen Studd, with his close-up study of a giant carrot taken in Malvern, near Worcester, England.

Mr Studd said: ‘While at the giant vegetable competition at Malvern, I used a macro lens to capture the wonderful abstract patterns on display.’

Mr Studd will receive £500 ($650) for the image as well as feature in the new IGPOTY book and at the flagship exhibition at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, London, in February 2018.

Lab-grown mini brains snap together like building blocks

Scientists could soon grow mini-brains by snapping together living parts like building blocks thanks to a newly developed technique.

Researchers have created pea-sized ‘organoids’ – distinct, three-dimensional replicas of regions of the brain.

These regions can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops.

Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia.

Scroll down for video

Scientists could soon grow mini-brains by snapping together living parts like building blocks thanks to a newly developed technique. This sped-up animation shows the connecting cells of two ‘organoids’ created by researchers (credit: Yale University)

MINI-BRAINS 

body“>

The mini-brains in existence today are a long way from the complexity of a real brain, meaning their use in research is limited.

Scientists have also had problems with consistency, finding that each organ rarely grows in the same way even when developed using the same growth protocols and starting materials.

A new mini-brain growth technique using small ‘organoids’ allows for highly replicable modules of developing brain parts to be snapped together like building blocks.

The team, from Yale University in Connecticut, say this technique could allow for a higher level of mini-brain complexity and consistency.

The researchers, from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, used stem cells to create and fuse two types of organoids from different brain regions.

They did this to show how the developing brain maintains proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

A failure to maintain this balance has been linked with a host of developmental brain disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

‘The inhibitory neurons migrate from specific areas of the embryonic brain to the region where excitatory neurons are being produced,’ said study lead author Dr In-Hyun Park.

‘What we did is to fuse these two areas and watched the process unfold.’

The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (MGE).

The MGE produces inhibitory neurons and plays a crucial but brief role in early development of the brain’s cortex region.

By merging this structure with another that produces excitatory neurons they were able to track the movement of the inhibitory cells.

These provide a crucial ‘brake’ on excitatory neurons and so are needed to stop the development of several serious conditions linked to brain over-activity.

Understanding the process will not only help researchers study how the brain evolved, but also shed light on how imbalances contribute to many neurological disorders.

 The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (pictured)

 The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (pictured)

 The Yale team used human stem cells, some derived from blood and others from embryonic stem cells, to grow an organoid called the human medial ganglionic eminence (pictured)

This animation shows a cerebral organoid, or mini-brain, grown in a laboratory. It contains a diversity of cell types and internal structures that can make it a good stand-in for an actual brain in experiments (credit: Brown University)  

For instance, excess excitatory neuron activity has been linked to schizophrenia, while too much inhibitory neuronal activity may cause depression.

Evidence suggests that in these conditions, Dr Park told Quanta: ‘There seems to be an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neural activity.

‘So those diseases can be studied using the current model that we’ve developed.’ 

The imbalance has also been linked to development of autism spectrum disorders, he said.

The organoids can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops. Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia (stock image)

The organoids can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops. Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia (stock image)

The organoids can connect together to form a functioning mini-mind that can help scientists to understand how the brain develops. Experts say the technique could also help researchers study degenerative brain diseases such as autism and schizophrenia (stock image)

The mini-brains in existence today are a long way from the complexity of a real brain, meaning their use in research is limited.

Scientists have also had problems with consistency, finding that the organs rarely grow uniformly even when developed using the same growth protocols and starting materials.

But the new organoid technique allows for highly replicable modules of developing brain parts to be snapped together like building blocks.

The Yale team suggest this technique could one day allow for a higher level of mini-brain complexity and consistency.

Female helicopter pilots flaunt their lives on Instagram

Aviation is a traditionally male dominated industry with women more likely to be found working in the cabin than the cockpit – but times are changing. 

Increasing numbers of women are pursuing careers as pilots and, eager to inspire a new generation, those who fly helicopters have been sharing images of life in the sky on Instagram

Less than 10 per cent of licenced helicopter pilots are women, but these ladies are bound to attract new recruits by showing off their equally enviable lives back on solid ground too, such as Asdis Ran Gunnarsdottir an Icelandic model, who just so happens to have a pilots licence.

The mother-of-three  who is divorced from footballer Garðar Bergmann Gunnlaugsson, is known as IceQueen and in addition to flying she has her own lingerie and make-up ranges as well as working as a TV presenter. 

Fellow model Zinta Braukis from LA combines flying hours with her passion for horses as an amateur polo player and has an eye on being a pilot for her post-fashion career.

‘I like the technical aspects of this type of flying, and decided to go back to school to obtain my commercial pilot’s license with the idea that maybe one day this will be my career,’ the model who has posed for Calvin Klein told Sideline News.  

Meanwhile, pilot Andrea Puccinelli who divides her time between California and Germany is all about clean living and regularly treats her 14,000 Instagram followers to snaps of her intense yoga regime and Thai boxing training.

Beach day.

A post shared by my name is Zinta (@zintapolo) on

 

Ian Leslie on why lying can be good for you (honest!)

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Glamorous female helicopter pilots flaunt enviable lives

Aviation is a traditionally male dominated industry with women more likely to be found working in the cabin than the cockpit – but times are changing. 

Increasing numbers of women are pursuing careers as pilots and, eager to inspire a new generation, those who fly helicopters have been sharing images of life in the sky on Instagram. 

Less than 10 per cent of licenced helicopter pilots are women, but these ladies are bound to attract new recruits by showing off their equally enviable lives back on solid ground too, such as Asdis Ran Gunnarsdottir an Icelandic model, who just so happens to have a pilots licence.

The mother-of-three  who is divorced from footballer Garðar Bergmann Gunnlaugsson, is known as IceQueen and in addition to flying she has her own lingerie and make-up ranges as well as working as a TV presenter. 

Fellow model Zinta Braukis from LA combines flying hours with her passion for horses as an amateur polo player and has an eye on being a pilot for her post-fashion career.

‘I like the technical aspects of this type of flying, and decided to go back to school to obtain my commercial pilot’s license with the idea that maybe one day this will be my career,’ the model who has posed for Calvin Klein told Sideline News.  

Meanwhile, pilot Andrea Puccinelli who divides her time between California and Germany is all about clean living and regularly treats her 14,000 Instagram followers to snaps of her intense yoga regime and Thai boxing training.

Beach day.

A post shared by my name is Zinta (@zintapolo) on

 

Corbyn or Blair? Guess which one’s the real menace 

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Coleen Rooney reveals what life is like living with hubbie

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